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Investigating Immersion and Learning in a Low-Embodied versus High-Embodied Digital Educational Game: Lessons Learned from an Implementation in an Authentic School Classroom

1
Cyprus Interaction Lab, Department of Multimedia and Graphic Arts, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol 3036, Cyprus
2
Research Center on Interactive Media, Smart Systems and Emerging Technologies, Nicosia 1066, Cyprus
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3040068
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 1 October 2019 / Accepted: 10 October 2019 / Published: 12 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodal Interaction in the Cyberspace)
Immersion is often argued to be one of the main driving forces behind children’s learning in digital educational games. Researchers have supported that movement-based interaction afforded by emerging embodied digital educational games may heighten even more immersion and learning. However, there is lack of empirical research warranting these claims. This case study has investigated the impact of high-embodied digital educational game, integrated in a primary school classroom, on children’s immersion and content knowledge about nutrition (condition1 = 24 children), in comparison to the impact of a low-embodied version of the game (condition2 = 20 children). Post-interventional surveys investigating immersion indicated that there was difference only on the level of engagement, in terms of perceived usability, while children’s learning gains in terms of content knowledge did not differ among the two conditions. Interviews with a subset of the children (n = 8 per condition) resulted in the identification of (a) media form, (b) media content and (c) context-related factors, which provided plausible explanations about children’s experienced immersion. Implications are discussed for supporting immersion in high-embodied educational digital games. View Full-Text
Keywords: embodied digital educational games; children; immersion; content knowledge; authentic educational settings embodied digital educational games; children; immersion; content knowledge; authentic educational settings
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Georgiou, Y.; Ioannou, A.; Ioannou, M. Investigating Immersion and Learning in a Low-Embodied versus High-Embodied Digital Educational Game: Lessons Learned from an Implementation in an Authentic School Classroom. Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3, 68.

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