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Open AccessArticlePost Publication Peer ReviewVersion 4, Approved

Fall Risk in Older Adults Transitioning between Different Flooring Materials (Version 4, Approved)

1
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
2
School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 February 2019 / Accepted: 8 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2020
Peer review status: 2nd round review Read review reports

Reviewer 1 Nicola Luigi Bragazzi Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (LIAM), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada Reviewer 2 Evan A. Nadhim Lecture at the Iraqi ministry of higher education and scientific research
Version 1
Original
Approved with revisions
Authors' response
Approved with revisions
Authors' response
Version 2
Revised
Approved Approved with revisions
Authors' response
Version 3
Revised
Approved
Version 4
Approved
Version 4, Approved
Published: 10 April 2020
DOI: 10.3390/sci2020025
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Version 3, Revised
Published: 10 March 2020
DOI: 10.3390/sci2010009
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Version 2, Revised
Published: 1 November 2019
DOI: 10.3390/sci1030066
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Version 1, Original
Published: 16 April 2019
DOI: 10.3390/sci1030063
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As there is lack of understanding about the effect of transitioning between different flooring materials on the gait of older adults, this study investigated the effect of transitioning between a carpeted floor and a vinyl floor on the gait characteristics of older adults. Fourteen older (65 years old and over) and 14 younger (18 to 35 years old) adults walked on different transitional floors by measuring various gait parameters. While the older participants had greater toe clearance than their younger counterparts, the older participants had smaller toe clearance on a carpeted floor than on a vinyl floor, which would increase the probability of a trip-induced fall. Further, the study found the slower transitional acceleration of the whole body COM and the increased friction demand, especially during the toe-off phase, rather than heel contact phase, which will lead to a slip-induced fall on a vinyl floor shortly after transitioning from a carpeted floor to a vinyl floor. Although the increased likelihood of a slip or trip accident was found throughout the changes in gait parameters, the older participants did not perceive of slipping and tripping much. Therefore, older adults are recommended to be made aware of the danger of slipping and tripping while transitioning between different flooring materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: safety; ageing; falls; gait; home safety; ageing; falls; gait; home
MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.N.; Lockhart, T.E. Fall Risk in Older Adults Transitioning between Different Flooring Materials. Sci 2020, 2, 25.

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1

Reviewer 1

Sent on 18 Oct 2019 by Nicola Luigi Bragazzi | Approved with revisions
Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (LIAM), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada

The last paragraph of introduction before the statement of the aims/purposes of the study should be moved to discussion. Just provide a more general overview of the literature, without detailing results, p-values, statistical significances and related stuff. 

May I have missed it, but it is not clear to me the kind of sample recruitment authors performed. Also the sample size: is there a scientific rational for it (for instance, an a priori sample size power analysis)? Authors should demonstrate that their study is sufficiently powered to capture an adequate effect size. 

Could authors provide their results also in terms of effect sizes?

Response to Reviewer 1

Sent on 16 Jul 2020 by Hyung Nam Kim, Thurmon Lockhart

Revision: Thanks for the review. The last paragraph includes the arguments that three has been lack of understanding of the gait characteristics of older adults transitioning between different flooring coverings, which is a critical information to explain to a reader why this study needs to be conducted (i.e., rationale of this study). Yet, the paragraph includes the numerical values (i.e., participants’ age Mean and SD) that come from other studies. Although the data are not directly associated with gait characteristics, a reader may be confused to consider them as statistical analysis results. Therefore, we revised it to delete the numerical values so that the introduction section appears to include general information only.

Revision: We appreciate your advice. A convenience sampling method was used, and a sample size justification has been added accordingly.

Revision: Thanks! We added the effect sizes.

Reviewer 2

Sent on 10 Oct 2019 by Evan A. Nadhim | Approved with revisions
Lecture at the Iraqi ministry of higher education and scientific research

Many thanks for the clear presentation of the research objectives. However, some justifications can be added to your valuable topic. 

1- Can you provide stronger justification of why the sample size is (14) for both the older and younger participants? 

2- Have you checked the statistical distribution of the time in the stages throughout the experiment? (i.e. also the slip and trip probability).

3- some of the paragraphs require editing to fix some grammatical issues  

Good luck in your publication. 

Response to Reviewer 2

Sent on 16 Jul 2020 by Hyung Nam Kim, Thurmon Lockhart

Revision: Thanks for your review. A sample size justification has been added accordingly.

Revision: We appreciate your comment. We measured the time while the participants were transitioning/walking on each floor condition, which contributed to calculating the velocity of heel contact and the transitional acceleration of the whole body center-of-mass (COM). The revised result section includes detailed descriptions of the velocity and the likelihood of slipping for different walking floor conditions.

Revision: Thank you for your advice. It has been done accordingly.

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