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Open AccessArticle

Image Stabilization in Central Vision Loss: The Horizontal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex

1
Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada
2
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada
3
Centre for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dr. Steinbach passed away suddenly on 24 June 2017.
Vision 2018, 2(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision2020019
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 13 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Age-Related Macular Degeneration)
For patients with central vision loss and controls with normal vision, we examined the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in complete darkness and in the light when enhanced by vision (VVOR). We expected that the visual-vestibular interaction during VVOR would produce an asymmetry in the gain due to the location of the preferred retinal locus (PRL) of the patients. In the dark, we hypothesized that the VOR would not be affected by the loss of central vision. Nine patients (ages 67 to 92 years) and 17 controls (ages 16 to 81 years) were tested in 10-s active VVOR and VOR procedures at a constant frequency of 0.5 Hz while their eyes and head movements were recorded with a video-based binocular eye tracker. We computed the gain by analyzing the eye and head peak velocities produced during the intervals between saccades. In the light and in darkness, a significant proportion of patients showed larger leftward than rightward peak velocities, consistent with a PRL to the left of the scotoma. No asymmetries were found for the controls. These data support the notion that, after central vision loss, the preferred retinal locus (PRL) in eccentric vision becomes the centre of visual direction, even in the dark. View Full-Text
Keywords: vestibulo-ocular reflex; eye movements; age-related macular degeneration; central vision loss; preferred retinal locus vestibulo-ocular reflex; eye movements; age-related macular degeneration; central vision loss; preferred retinal locus
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González, E.G.; Shi, R.; Tarita-Nistor, L.; Mandelcorn, E.D.; Mandelcorn, M.S.; Steinbach, M.J. Image Stabilization in Central Vision Loss: The Horizontal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex. Vision 2018, 2, 19.

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