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Commentary

COVID-19 Surveillance and Competition in Sport: Utilizing Sport Science to Protect Athletes and Staff during and after the Pandemic

1
Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
2
College of Physical Activity and Sport Science, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
3
Detroit Lions, Allen Park, MI 48101, USA
4
Athletic Department, University of Cincinnati, NovaCare Rehabilitation, Cincinnati, OH 45220, USA
5
Athletic Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2020, 5(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5030069
Received: 3 August 2020 / Revised: 26 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Performance Analysis and Training Monitoring in Team Sports)
The ongoing Coronavirus 2 (COVID-19) pandemic abruptly halted athletic competition and standard training practices, consequently generating great confusion surrounding when and how to safely reintroduce sports. Therefore, tangible solutions disseminated to performance staff, coaches, and athletes are warranted to ensure optimal levels of health and physical performance for all personnel during both the current social distancing standards as well as the impending return of competition despite continued risks. In this commentary, we offer strategies for utilizing technology and data tools as components of longitudinal COVID-19 surveillance based on ongoing research efforts as well as current guidance from governing bodies, while also serving the performance needs of the athletes and staff. Recommended data sources include digital symptom and well-being surveys, standardized and routine physical performance testing, sleep and sleep physiology monitoring, cognitive applications, and temperature. This system is flexible to numerous commercially available products and is designed for easy implementation that permits instant feedback provided directly to the athlete as well as their support staff for early intervention, ultimately mitigating COVID-19 risks. We will discuss multiple options, including examples of data, data visualizations and recommendations for data interpretation and communication. View Full-Text
Keywords: athlete monitoring; COVID-19; wellness; training load; wearables; digital health; sport science; recovery athlete monitoring; COVID-19; wellness; training load; wearables; digital health; sport science; recovery
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hagen, J.; Stone, J.D.; Hornsby, W.G.; Stephenson, M.; Mangine, R.; Joseph, M.; Galster, S. COVID-19 Surveillance and Competition in Sport: Utilizing Sport Science to Protect Athletes and Staff during and after the Pandemic. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2020, 5, 69. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5030069

AMA Style

Hagen J, Stone JD, Hornsby WG, Stephenson M, Mangine R, Joseph M, Galster S. COVID-19 Surveillance and Competition in Sport: Utilizing Sport Science to Protect Athletes and Staff during and after the Pandemic. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology. 2020; 5(3):69. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5030069

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hagen, Joshua, Jason D. Stone, W. G. Hornsby, Mark Stephenson, Robert Mangine, Michael Joseph, and Scott Galster. 2020. "COVID-19 Surveillance and Competition in Sport: Utilizing Sport Science to Protect Athletes and Staff during and after the Pandemic" Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology 5, no. 3: 69. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5030069

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