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Open AccessArticle

The Influence of Upper and Lower Extremity Strength on Performance-Based Sarcopenia Assessment Tests

1
Muscle Morphology, Mechanics, and Performance Laboratory, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC 20422, USA
2
Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, The George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC 20052, USA
3
Geriatrics Service/Research Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC 20422, USA
4
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC 20422, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3040053
Received: 13 October 2018 / Revised: 27 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 3 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sarcopenia, Muscle Wasting and Exercise)
The optimal management of sarcopenia requires appropriate endpoint measures to determine intervention efficacy. While hand grip strength is a predictor of morbidity and mortality, lower extremity strength may be better associated with functional activities in comparison to hand grip strength. The purpose of our study was to examine the comparative association of upper and lower extremity strength with common measures of physical performance in older adults. Thirty community-dwelling men, aged 62.5 ± 9.2 years, completed body composition analysis, quantitative strength testing, and performance-based tests of functional status. Hand grip force values were not significantly associated with knee extensor or flexor torque values (p > 0.05). Hand grip force was only associated with fast gait speed, while knee extensor torque at 60°/s was the only variable significantly associated across all functional outcome measures: customary gait speed, fast gait speed, sit to stand time, and the Physical Performance Test (p < 0.02). Hand grip strength was not a proxy measure of lower extremity strength as assessed in this study. Overall, lower extremity muscle strength values had the strongest associations with participant functional performance. Lower extremity strength testing may provide additional value as an endpoint measure in the assessment and clinical management of sarcopenia. View Full-Text
Keywords: sarcopenia; strength assessment; lower extremity strength; hand grip strength; gait speed; physical performance; functional status sarcopenia; strength assessment; lower extremity strength; hand grip strength; gait speed; physical performance; functional status
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Harris-Love, M.O.; Benson, K.; Leasure, E.; Adams, B.; McIntosh, V. The Influence of Upper and Lower Extremity Strength on Performance-Based Sarcopenia Assessment Tests. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3, 53.

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