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The Combined Impact of CLIR Post-Analytical Tools and Second Tier Testing on the Performance of Newborn Screening for Disorders of Propionate, Methionine, and Cobalamin Metabolism

Biochemical Genetics Laboratory, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
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Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2020, 6(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijns6020033
Received: 25 February 2020 / Revised: 3 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CLIR Applications for Newborn Screening)
The expansion of the recommend uniform screening panel to include more than 50 primary and secondary target conditions has resulted in a substantial increase of false positive results. As an alternative to subjective manipulation of cutoff values and overutilization of molecular testing, here we describe the performance outcome of an algorithm for disorders of methionine, cobalamin, and propionate metabolism that includes: (1) first tier screening inclusive of the broadest available spectrum of markers measured by tandem mass spectrometry; (2) integration of all results into a score of likelihood of disease for each target condition calculated by post-analytical interpretive tools created byCollaborative Laboratory Integrated Reports (CLIR), a multivariate pattern recognition software; and (3) further evaluation of abnormal scores by a second tier test measuring homocysteine, methylmalonic acid, and methylcitric acid. This approach can consistently reduce false positive rates to a <0.01% level, which is the threshold of precision newborn screening. We postulate that broader adoption of this algorithm could lead to substantial savings in health care expenditures. More importantly, it could prevent the stress and anxiety experienced by many families when faced with an abnormal newborn screening result that is later resolved as a false positive outcome. View Full-Text
Keywords: Collaborative Laboratory Integrated Reports (CLIR); false positive rate; newborn screening (NBS); second tier test (2TT) Collaborative Laboratory Integrated Reports (CLIR); false positive rate; newborn screening (NBS); second tier test (2TT)
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Gavrilov, D.K.; Piazza, A.L.; Pino, G.; Turgeon, C.; Matern, D.; Oglesbee, D.; Raymond, K.; Tortorelli, S.; Rinaldo, P. The Combined Impact of CLIR Post-Analytical Tools and Second Tier Testing on the Performance of Newborn Screening for Disorders of Propionate, Methionine, and Cobalamin Metabolism. Int. J. Neonatal Screen. 2020, 6, 33.

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