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Article

“You’re the One That Was on Uncle’s Wall!”: Identity, Whanaungatanga and Connection for Takatāpui (LGBTQ+ Māori)

1
School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Te Wānanga o Waipapa, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
3
School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
4
Politics and International Relations, School of Social Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genealogy 2021, 5(2), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020054
Received: 15 April 2021 / Revised: 20 May 2021 / Accepted: 27 May 2021 / Published: 4 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indigenous Identity and Community)
Takatāpui (Māori LGBTIQ+) challenge static notions of relationality and belonging or whanaungatanga for Māori. Explorations of Māori and LGBTIQ+ identity can often polarise experiences of family as either nurturing spaces or sites comprised of actors of spiritual and physical violence. However, such framing ignores the ways in which cultural practices for establishing relationality for takatāpui extend beyond dichotomies of disconnection or connection within families and into spaces of new potential. In this paper we outline a bricoleur research praxis rooted in Māori ways of being which underpins the research. We engage in photo-poetry as an analytic tool, constructing poetry from our interviews with Waimirirangi, a twenty-year-old whakawahine (Māori term for trans woman or trans femme) and bring them into conversation with the images she provided as part of the broader research project. As the interface between her ancestors and future generations, Waimirirangi demonstrates the potentiality of whanaungatanga as a restorative practice for enhancing takatāpui wellbeing. View Full-Text
Keywords: takatāpui; Indigenous LGBTIQ+ identities; re-membering; photo-poetry; case study; whanaungatanga; relationality takatāpui; Indigenous LGBTIQ+ identities; re-membering; photo-poetry; case study; whanaungatanga; relationality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hamley, L.; Groot, S.; Le Grice, J.; Gillon, A.; Greaves, L.; Manchi, M.; Clark, T. “You’re the One That Was on Uncle’s Wall!”: Identity, Whanaungatanga and Connection for Takatāpui (LGBTQ+ Māori). Genealogy 2021, 5, 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020054

AMA Style

Hamley L, Groot S, Le Grice J, Gillon A, Greaves L, Manchi M, Clark T. “You’re the One That Was on Uncle’s Wall!”: Identity, Whanaungatanga and Connection for Takatāpui (LGBTQ+ Māori). Genealogy. 2021; 5(2):54. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hamley, Logan, Shiloh Groot, Jade Le Grice, Ashlea Gillon, Lara Greaves, Madhavi Manchi, and Terryann Clark. 2021. "“You’re the One That Was on Uncle’s Wall!”: Identity, Whanaungatanga and Connection for Takatāpui (LGBTQ+ Māori)" Genealogy 5, no. 2: 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5020054

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