Next Article in Journal
A Novel Method for Safety Analysis of Cyber-Physical Systems—Application to a Ship Exhaust Gas Scrubber System
Previous Article in Journal
Effect of Road Markings and Traffic Signs Presence on Young Driver Stress Level, Eye Movement and Behaviour in Night-Time Conditions: A Driving Simulator Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Characteristics of Commuters’ Single-Bicycle Crashes in Insurance Data
Open AccessArticle

Effects Influencing Pedestrian–Vehicle Crash Frequency by Severity Level: A Case Study of Seoul Metropolitan City, South Korea

1
Department of Urban Planning, Keimyung University, Daegu 42601, Korea
2
Land & Housing Institute, Daejeon 34047, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Safety 2020, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety6020025
Received: 4 February 2020 / Revised: 27 April 2020 / Accepted: 6 May 2020 / Published: 13 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Motorized Road Users Safety)
This study aimed to determine how built environments affect pedestrian–vehicle collisions. The study examined pedestrian–vehicular crashes that occurred between 2013 and 2015 in Seoul, Korea, by comparing and analyzing different effects of the built environment on pedestrian–vehicle crashes. Specifically, the study analyzed built environment attributes, land use environment, housing types, road environment, and traffic characteristics to determine how these factors affect the severity of pedestrian injury. The results of the statistical analysis appear to infer that the built environment attributes had dissimilar impacts on pedestrian collisions, depending on the injury severity. In general, both incapacitating and non-incapacitating injuries appear to be more likely to be caused by the built environment than fatal and possible injuries. These results highlight the need to consider injury severity when implementing more effective interventions and strategies for ensuring pedestrian safety. However, because of the small sample size, an expanded research project regarding this issue should be considered, as it would contribute to the development and implementation of effective policies and interventions for pedestrian safety in Korea. This study therefore offers practical information regarding the development of such an expanded study to inform future traffic safety policies in Seoul to establish a “safe walking city.” View Full-Text
Keywords: built environment; geographic information system; pedestrian safety; pedestrian–vehicle crash; severity of injury built environment; geographic information system; pedestrian safety; pedestrian–vehicle crash; severity of injury
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Park, S.-H.; Bae, M.-K. Effects Influencing Pedestrian–Vehicle Crash Frequency by Severity Level: A Case Study of Seoul Metropolitan City, South Korea. Safety 2020, 6, 25.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop