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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

The Effect of All-Terrain Vehicle Crash Location on Emergency Medical Services Time Intervals

Department of Emergency Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
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Safety 2019, 5(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety5040073
Received: 16 September 2019 / Revised: 18 October 2019 / Accepted: 22 October 2019 / Published: 25 October 2019
Over 100,000 all-terrain vehicle (ATV)-related injuries are evaluated in U.S. emergency departments each year. In this study, we analyzed the time intervals for emergency medical services (EMS) providers responding to ATV crashes in different location types. Data from the Iowa State Trauma Registry and a statewide ATV crash/injury database was matched with Iowa EMS Registry records from 2004–2014. Ground ambulance responses to 270 ATV crashes were identified, and response characteristics and time intervals were analyzed. Off-road crashes had a longer median patient access interval (p < 0.001) and total on scene interval (p = 0.002) than roadway crashes. Crashes in remote locations had a longer median patient access interval (p < 0.001) and total on scene interval (p < 0.001), but also a longer median on scene with patient interval (p = 0.004) than crashes in accessible locations. Fifteen percent of remote patient access times were >6 min as compared to 3% of accessible crashes (p = 0.0004). There were no differences in en route to scene or en route to hospital time. Comparisons by location type showed no differences in injury severity score or number of total procedures performed. We concluded that responding EMS providers had an increased length of time to get to the patient after arriving on scene for off-road and remote ATV crashes relative to roadway and accessible location crashes, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: all-terrain vehicles; off-road vehicles; emergency medical services; recreational parks; rural health services all-terrain vehicles; off-road vehicles; emergency medical services; recreational parks; rural health services
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Wubben, B.M.; Denning, G.M.; Jennissen, C.A. The Effect of All-Terrain Vehicle Crash Location on Emergency Medical Services Time Intervals. Safety 2019, 5, 73.

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