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Article

Cucumis melo L. Germplasm in Tunisia: Unexploited Sources of Resistance to Fusarium Wilt

1
Regional Research Centre on Horticulture and Organic Agriculture (CRRHAB), LR21AGR03, University of Sousse, Sousse 4042, Tunisia
2
Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea-La Mayora, UMA-CSIC, 29750 Algarrobo, Spain
3
Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón—IA2 (CITA-Universidad de Zaragoza), Avda. Montañana 930, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Stefania M. Mang, Antonella Vitti and Habil. Aurel Maxim
Horticulturae 2021, 7(8), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080208
Received: 17 May 2021 / Revised: 16 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 22 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Plant Pathogens on Horticultural Plants)
Breeding for disease resistance has been one of the most important research objectives in melon for the last few decades. Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (Fom) is among the most threatening melon fungal diseases along the Mediterranean coast, affecting yield and quality. Since genetic resistance is one of the best sustainable strategies that can be used to control this pathogen, 27 Tunisian melon accessions collected from local farmers have been tested using phenotypic and molecular approaches to identify new sources of resistance to be used directly as cultivars in affected areas or as resistance donors in breeding programs. The phenotypic evaluations, using artificial inoculations, showed several resistant accessions to the pathogenic races of Fom. Additionally, molecular analysis revealed that 13 out of 27 accessions carried the resistance Fom-1 gene (7 in homozygous state and 6 in heterozygous state), confirming their resistance to races 0 and 2. Two of them were also identified as heterozygous for the Fom-2 gene, being resistant to races 0 and 1. Furthermore, two accessions with a high level of resistance to the most virulent race 1.2 have been also reported. This melon germplasm should be explored as a potential source of resistance genes in breeding programs to develop new resistant melon cultivars. View Full-Text
Keywords: melon; breeding program; genetic resistance; Fom-1 and Fom-2 genes; molecular markers; Fom race 1.2 melon; breeding program; genetic resistance; Fom-1 and Fom-2 genes; molecular markers; Fom race 1.2
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chikh-Rouhou, H.; Gómez-Guillamón, M.L.; González, V.; Sta-Baba, R.; Garcés-Claver, A. Cucumis melo L. Germplasm in Tunisia: Unexploited Sources of Resistance to Fusarium Wilt. Horticulturae 2021, 7, 208. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080208

AMA Style

Chikh-Rouhou H, Gómez-Guillamón ML, González V, Sta-Baba R, Garcés-Claver A. Cucumis melo L. Germplasm in Tunisia: Unexploited Sources of Resistance to Fusarium Wilt. Horticulturae. 2021; 7(8):208. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080208

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chikh-Rouhou, Hela, Maria L. Gómez-Guillamón, Vicente González, Rafika Sta-Baba, and Ana Garcés-Claver. 2021. "Cucumis melo L. Germplasm in Tunisia: Unexploited Sources of Resistance to Fusarium Wilt" Horticulturae 7, no. 8: 208. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080208

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