Next Article in Journal
Roles of Non-Coding RNAs in Normal Human Brain Development, Brain Tumor, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders
Next Article in Special Issue
Long Non-Coding RNA Function in CD4+ T Cells: What We Know and What Next?
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Long Non-Coding RNAs and the Innate Immune Response
Open AccessFeature PaperReview

MicroRNAs in Neuroinflammation: Implications in Disease Pathogenesis, Biomarker Discovery and Therapeutic Applications

1
Prion Diseases Section, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory, 1015 Arlington St., Winnipeg, MB R3E 3R2, Canada
2
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 730 William Ave., Winnipeg, MB R3E 0W3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Non-Coding RNA 2019, 5(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna5020035
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 20 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA and the Immune System)
The central nervous system can respond to threat via the induction of an inflammatory response. Under normal circumstances this response is tightly controlled, however uncontrolled neuroinflammation is a hallmark of many neurological disorders. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that are important for regulating many cellular processes. The ability of microRNAs to modulate inflammatory signaling is an area of ongoing research, which has gained much attention in recent years. MicroRNAs may either promote or restrict inflammatory signaling, and either exacerbate or ameliorate the pathological consequences of excessive neuroinflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the mode of regulation for several important and well-studied microRNAs in the context of neuroinflammation, including miR-155, miR-146a, miR-124, miR-21 and let-7. Furthermore, the pathological consequences of miRNA deregulation during disorders that feature neuroinflammation are discussed, including Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Prion diseases, Japanese encephalitis, Herpes encephalitis, ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. There has also been considerable interest in the use of altered microRNA signatures as biomarkers for these disorders. The ability to modulate microRNA expression may even serve as the basis for future therapeutic strategies to help treat pathological neuroinflammation. View Full-Text
Keywords: microRNA; neuroinflammation; neurodegeneration; central nervous system; immunity; biomarkers; therapeutics microRNA; neuroinflammation; neurodegeneration; central nervous system; immunity; biomarkers; therapeutics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Slota, J.A.; Booth, S.A. MicroRNAs in Neuroinflammation: Implications in Disease Pathogenesis, Biomarker Discovery and Therapeutic Applications. Non-Coding RNA 2019, 5, 35.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop