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Article

Distribution and Origin of Major, Trace and Rare Earth Elements in Wild Edible Mushrooms: Urban vs. Forest Areas

Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Bijenička 54, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
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Academic Editors: Anush Kosakyan, Rodica Catana, Alona Biketova and Laurent Dufossé
J. Fungi 2021, 7(12), 1068; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7121068
Received: 8 October 2021 / Revised: 29 November 2021 / Accepted: 8 December 2021 / Published: 12 December 2021
This paper investigates the composition of major, trace, and rare earth elements in 15 different species of wild edible mushrooms and the possible effect of urban pollution on elemental uptake. The collected mushrooms include different species from the green areas of the city, exposed to urban pollution, and from the forests, with limited anthropogenic influence. Through a comprehensive approach that included the analysis of 46 elements, an attempt was made to expand knowledge about element uptake by mushroom fruiting bodies. The results showed a wide variability in the composition of mushrooms, suggesting a number of factors influencing their element uptake capacity. The data obtained do not indicate significant exposure to anthropogenic influences, regardless of sampling location. While major elements’ levels appear to be influenced more by species-specific affinities, this is not true for trace elements, whose levels presumably reflect the geochemical characteristics of the sampling site. However, the risk assessment showed that consumption of excessive amounts of the mushrooms studied, both from urban areas and from forests, may have adverse health effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: mushrooms; trace elements; rare earth elements; urban soils; forest mushrooms; trace elements; rare earth elements; urban soils; forest
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ivanić, M.; Furdek Turk, M.; Tkalčec, Z.; Fiket, Ž.; Mešić, A. Distribution and Origin of Major, Trace and Rare Earth Elements in Wild Edible Mushrooms: Urban vs. Forest Areas. J. Fungi 2021, 7, 1068. https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7121068

AMA Style

Ivanić M, Furdek Turk M, Tkalčec Z, Fiket Ž, Mešić A. Distribution and Origin of Major, Trace and Rare Earth Elements in Wild Edible Mushrooms: Urban vs. Forest Areas. Journal of Fungi. 2021; 7(12):1068. https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7121068

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ivanić, Maja, Martina Furdek Turk, Zdenko Tkalčec, Željka Fiket, and Armin Mešić. 2021. "Distribution and Origin of Major, Trace and Rare Earth Elements in Wild Edible Mushrooms: Urban vs. Forest Areas" Journal of Fungi 7, no. 12: 1068. https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7121068

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