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Updates on the Taxonomy of Mucorales with an Emphasis on Clinically Important Taxa
Open AccessReview

Biotic Environments Supporting the Persistence of Clinically Relevant Mucormycetes

1
Mycology Reference Centre Manchester, ECMM Excellence Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
2
Division of Infection, Immunity & Respiratory Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9NT, UK
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester M23 9LT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Fungi 2020, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof6010004
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 13 December 2019 / Accepted: 17 December 2019 / Published: 20 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mucorales and Mucormycosis)
Clinically relevant members of the Mucorales group can grow and are found in diverse ecological spaces such as soil, dust, water, decomposing vegetation, on and in food, and in hospital environments but are poorly represented in mycobiome studies of outdoor and indoor air. Occasionally, Mucorales are found in water-damaged buildings. This mini review examines a number of specialised biotic environments, including those revealed by natural disasters and theatres of war, that support the growth and persistence of these fungi. However, we are no further forward in understanding exposure pathways or the chronicity of exposure that results in the spectrum of clinical presentations of mucormycosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mucorales; mucormycosis; ecological niches; spore dispersal Mucorales; mucormycosis; ecological niches; spore dispersal
MDPI and ACS Style

Richardson, M.D.; Rautemaa-Richardson, R. Biotic Environments Supporting the Persistence of Clinically Relevant Mucormycetes. J. Fungi 2020, 6, 4.

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