Next Article in Journal
Fluconazole Resistance among Oral Candida Isolates from People Living with HIV/AIDS in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital
Next Article in Special Issue
The CWI Pathway: Regulation of the Transcriptional Adaptive Response to Cell Wall Stress in Yeast
Previous Article in Journal
HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Disease in Resource-Limited Settings: A Case for “Prevention Is Better Than Cure”?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Function and Biosynthesis of Cell Wall α-1,3-Glucan in Fungi
Article Menu
Issue 4 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
J. Fungi 2017, 3(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof3040068

The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway and Its Involvement in Secondary Metabolite Production

1
Leibniz Research Group Biobricks of Microbial Natural Product Syntheses, Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology-Hans Knöll Institute (HKI), Beutenberg Strasse 11a, 07745 Jena, Germany
2
Department of General Microbiology and Microbial Genetics, Institute of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology and Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 24, 07743 Jena, Germany
Received: 16 November 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 6 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Cell Wall)
Full-Text   |   PDF [592 KB, uploaded 6 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

The fungal cell wall is the external and first layer that fungi use to interact with the environment. Every stress signal, before being translated into an appropriate stress response, needs to overtake this layer. Many signaling pathways are involved in translating stress signals, but the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway is the one responsible for the maintenance and biosynthesis of the fungal cell wall. In fungi, the CWI signal is composed of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module. After the start of the phosphorylation cascade, the CWI signal induces the expression of cell-wall-related genes. However, the function of the CWI signal is not merely the activation of cell wall biosynthesis, but also the regulation of expression and production of specific molecules that are used by fungi to better compete in the environment. These molecules are normally defined as secondary metabolites or natural products. This review is focused on secondary metabolites affected by the CWI signal pathway with a special focus on relevant natural products such as melanins, mycotoxins, and antibacterial compounds. View Full-Text
Keywords: mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (Mpk1); mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs); cell wall integrity pathway; melanin; secondary metabolites mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (Mpk1); mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs); cell wall integrity pathway; melanin; secondary metabolites
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Valiante, V. The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway and Its Involvement in Secondary Metabolite Production. J. Fungi 2017, 3, 68.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J. Fungi EISSN 2309-608X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top