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J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis., Volume 4, Issue 1 (March 2017) – 3 articles

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Management of Arrhythmias in Heart Failure
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2017, 4(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd4010003 - 28 Feb 2017
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3647
Abstract
Heart failure patients are predisposed to develop arrhythmias. Supraventricular arrhythmias can exacerbate the heart failure symptoms by decreasing the effective cardiac output and their control require pharmacological, electrical, or catheter-based intervention. In the setting of atrial flutter or atrial fibrillation, anticoagulation becomes paramount [...] Read more.
Heart failure patients are predisposed to develop arrhythmias. Supraventricular arrhythmias can exacerbate the heart failure symptoms by decreasing the effective cardiac output and their control require pharmacological, electrical, or catheter-based intervention. In the setting of atrial flutter or atrial fibrillation, anticoagulation becomes paramount to prevent systemic or cerebral embolism. Patients with heart failure are also prone to develop ventricular arrhythmias that can present a challenge to the managing clinician. The management strategy depends on the type of arrhythmia, the underlying structural heart disease, the severity of heart failure, and the range from optimization of heart failure therapy to catheter ablation. Patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction are at high risk for developing sudden cardiac death, however risk stratification is a clinical challenge and requires a multiparametric evaluation for identification of patients who should undergo implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator. Finally, patients with heart failure can also develop symptomatic bradycardia, caused by sinus node dysfunction or atrio-ventricular block. The treatment of bradycardia in these patients with pacing is usually straightforward but needs some specific issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heart Failure Pathogenesis and Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Collagenolytic Activity Is Associated with Scar Resolution in Zebrafish Hearts after Cryoinjury
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2017, 4(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd4010002 - 24 Feb 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3001
Abstract
Myocardial infarction is the major cause of cardiac injury in western countries and can result in a massive loss of heart cells, leading eventually to heart failure. A fibrotic collagen-rich scar may prevent ventricular wall rupture, but also may result in heart failure [...] Read more.
Myocardial infarction is the major cause of cardiac injury in western countries and can result in a massive loss of heart cells, leading eventually to heart failure. A fibrotic collagen-rich scar may prevent ventricular wall rupture, but also may result in heart failure because of its stiffness. In zebrafish, cardiac cryoinjury triggers a fibrotic response and scarring. Unlike with mammals, zebrafish heart has the striking ability to regenerate and to resolve the scar. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of scar resolution in zebrafish heart might facilitate the design of new therapeutic approaches to improve the recovery of patients. To visualize the collagenolytic activity within the zebrafish heart following cryoinjury, we used an in situ collagen zymography assay. We detected expression of mmp2 and mmp14a and these matrix metalloproteinases might contribute to the collagenase activity. Collagenolytic activity was present in the wound area, but decreased as the myocardium regenerated. Comparison with neonatal mouse hearts that failed to regenerate after transmural cryoinjury revealed a similar collagenolytic activity in the scar. These findings suggest that collagenolytic activity may be key to how the zebrafish heart resolves its scar; however, it is not sufficient in mouse hearts that lack efficient myocardial regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Myocardial Reprogramming in Development and Regeneration)
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease in 2016
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2017, 4(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd4010001 - 11 Jan 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1532
Abstract
The editors of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (JCDD) would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2016.[...] Full article
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