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Open AccessCase Report

Overt Infection with Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV) in Two Honey Bee Colonies

1
Centre for Applied Training and Learning, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Leipzig University, An den Tierkliniken 19, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
2
Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Leipzig University, An den Tierkliniken 43, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
3
Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Südufer 10, 17493 Greifswald, Insel Riems, Germany
4
LABOKLIN GmbH & CO.KG, Labor für klinische Diagnostik, Steubenstraße 4, 97688 Bad Kissingen, Germany
5
VETIDATA, Institute of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Leipzig University, An den Tierkliniken 39, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(3), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7030142
Received: 31 July 2020 / Revised: 15 September 2020 / Accepted: 16 September 2020 / Published: 22 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Honey Bee Health)
Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV), a widespread honey bee RNA virus, causes massive worker bee losses, mostly in strong colonies. Two different syndromes, with paralysis, ataxia and flight incapacity on one hand and black hairless individuals with shortened abdomens on the other, can affect a colony simultaneously. This case report presents two Apis mellifera carnica colonies with symptoms of paralysis and hairless black syndrome in 2019. Via RT-PCR, a highly positive result for CBPV was detected in both samples. Further problems, such as a Nosema infection and Varroa infestation, were present in these colonies. Therapy methods were applied to colony 1 comprising queen replacement, shook swarm method and Varroa control, whereas colony 2 was asphyxiated after queen loss and colony weakening. After therapy, colony 1 was wintered without symptoms. Beekeeping and sanitary measures can save a CBPV-infected colony, while further complications result in total colony loss. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic bee paralysis virus; Varroa infestation control; nosemosis; hairless black syndrome chronic bee paralysis virus; Varroa infestation control; nosemosis; hairless black syndrome
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Dittes, J.; Schäfer, M.O.; Aupperle-Lellbach, H.; Mülling, C.K.W.; Emmerich, I.U. Overt Infection with Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV) in Two Honey Bee Colonies. Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 142.

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