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Open AccessCase Report

African Swine Fever in Two Large Commercial Pig Farms in LATVIA—Estimation of the High Risk Period and Virus Spread within the Farm

1
Veterinary Surveillance Department, Food and Veterinary Service, Peldu iela 30, LV-1050 Riga, Latvia
2
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies, Liela iela 2, LV-3001 Jelgava, Latvia
3
Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment BIOR, Lejupes Street 3, LV-1076 Riga, Latvia
4
Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Fr.R.Kreutzwaldi 1, 51006 Tartu, Estonia
5
Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Südufer 10, 17493 Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(3), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7030105
Received: 6 July 2020 / Revised: 31 July 2020 / Accepted: 3 August 2020 / Published: 7 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue African Swine Fever (ASF))
African swine fever (ASF) was first detected in Latvia in wild boar at the Eastern border in June 2014. Since then ASF has continued to spread in wild boar populations covering almost whole territory of the country. Sporadic outbreaks occurred at the same time in domestic pig holdings located in wild boar infected areas. Here we present the results of the epidemiological investigation in two large commercial farms. Several parameters were analyzed to determine the high risk period (HRP) and to investigate the ASF virus spread within the farm. Clinical data, mortality rates and laboratory results proved to be good indicators for estimating the HRP. The measures for early disease detection, particularly the enhanced passive surveillance that is targeting dead and sick pigs, were analyzed and discussed. Enhanced passive surveillance proved to be a key element to detect ASF at an early stage. The study also showed that ASF virus might spread slowly within a large farm depending mainly on direct contacts between pigs and the level of internal biosecurity. Findings suggest improvements in outbreak prevention, control measures and may contribute to a better understanding of ASF spreading patterns within large pig herds. Culling of all pigs in large commercial farms could be reconsidered under certain conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: African swine fever; commercial farms; early detection; high risk period; disease control African swine fever; commercial farms; early detection; high risk period; disease control
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Lamberga, K.; Oļševskis, E.; Seržants, M.; Bērziņš, A.; Viltrop, A.; Depner, K. African Swine Fever in Two Large Commercial Pig Farms in LATVIA—Estimation of the High Risk Period and Virus Spread within the Farm. Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 105.

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