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Akkermansia and Microbial Degradation of Mucus in Cats and Dogs: Implications to the Growing Worldwide Epidemic of Pet Obesity

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Research and Development, MNA de Mexico, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66477, Mexico
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Animal Emergency & Specialty, Kirkland, WA 98034, USA
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Faculty of Agronomy, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, General Escobedo, Nuevo Leon 66050, Mexico
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Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474, USA
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Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, 6708 WE Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Human Microbiome Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7020044
Received: 10 March 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Microbiology and Immunology)
Akkermansia muciniphila is a mucin-degrading bacterium that has shown the potential to provide anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity effects in mouse and man. We here focus on companion animals, specifically cats and dogs, and evaluate the microbial degradation of mucus and its health impact in the context of the worldwide epidemic of pet obesity. A literature survey revealed that the two presently known Akkermansia spp., A. muciniphila and A. glycaniphila, as well as other members of the phylum of Verrucomicrobia seem to be neither very prevalent nor abundant in the digestive tract of cats and dog. While this may be due to methodological aspects, it suggests that bacteria related to Akkermansia are not the major mucus degraders in these pets and hence other mucus-utilizing taxa may deserve attention. Hence, we will discuss the potential of these endogenous mucus utilizers and dietary interventions to boost these as well as the use of Akkermansia spp. related bacteria or their components as strategies to target feline and canine obesity.
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Keywords: feline obesity; canine obesity; mucus degradation; companion animals feline obesity; canine obesity; mucus degradation; companion animals
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Garcia-Mazcorro, J.F.; Minamoto, Y.; Kawas, J.R.; Suchodolski, J.S.; de Vos, W.M. Akkermansia and Microbial Degradation of Mucus in Cats and Dogs: Implications to the Growing Worldwide Epidemic of Pet Obesity. Vet. Sci. 2020, 7, 44.

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