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Data Descriptor

Long-Term, Gridded Standardized Precipitation Index for Hawai‘i

1
Department of Geography and Environment, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
2
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
3
East-West Center, Honolulu, HI 96848, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Data 2020, 5(4), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/data5040109
Received: 17 September 2020 / Revised: 17 November 2020 / Accepted: 18 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Spatial Data Science and Digital Earth)
Spatially explicit, wall-to-wall rainfall data provide foundational climatic information but alone are inadequate for characterizing meteorological, hydrological, agricultural, or ecological drought. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is one of the most widely used indicators of drought and defines localized conditions of both drought and excess rainfall based on period-specific (e.g., 1-month, 6-month, 12-month) accumulated precipitation relative to multi-year averages. A 93-year (1920–2012), high-resolution (250 m) gridded dataset of monthly rainfall available for the State of Hawai‘i was used to derive gridded, monthly SPI values for 1-, 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, 24-, 36-, 48-, and 60-month intervals. Gridded SPI data were validated against independent, station-based calculations of SPI provided by the National Weather Service. The gridded SPI product was also compared with the U.S. Drought Monitor during the overlapping period. This SPI product provides several advantages over currently available drought indices for Hawai‘i in that it has statewide coverage over a long historical period at high spatial resolution to capture fine-scale climatic gradients and monitor changes in local drought severity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Standardized Precipitation Index; drought; Hawai‘i; gridded data; climate; rainfall Standardized Precipitation Index; drought; Hawai‘i; gridded data; climate; rainfall
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  • Externally hosted supplementary file 1
    Doi: 10.4211/hs.822553ead1d04869b5b3e1e3a3817ec6
    Link: https://www.hydroshare.org/resource/822553ead1d04869b5b3e1e3a3817ec6/
    Description: This dataset contains gridded monthly Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) at 10 timescales: 1-, 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, 18-, 24-, 36-, 48-, and 60-month intervals from 1920 to 2012 at 250 m resolution for seven of the eight main Hawaiian Islands (18.849°N, 154.668°W to 22.269°N, 159.816°W; the island of Ni‘ihau is excluded due to lack of data).
MDPI and ACS Style

Lucas, M.P.; Trauernicht, C.; Frazier, A.G.; Miura, T. Long-Term, Gridded Standardized Precipitation Index for Hawai‘i. Data 2020, 5, 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/data5040109

AMA Style

Lucas MP, Trauernicht C, Frazier AG, Miura T. Long-Term, Gridded Standardized Precipitation Index for Hawai‘i. Data. 2020; 5(4):109. https://doi.org/10.3390/data5040109

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lucas, Matthew P., Clay Trauernicht, Abby G. Frazier, and Tomoaki Miura. 2020. "Long-Term, Gridded Standardized Precipitation Index for Hawai‘i" Data 5, no. 4: 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/data5040109

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