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Article

Human Embryonic-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells (hES-MP Cells) are Fully Supported in Culture with Human Platelet Lysates

1
The Blood Bank, Landspitali—The National University Hospital of Iceland, Snorrabraut 60, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland
3
Platome Biotechnology, Alfaskeid 27, 220 Hafnarfjordur, Iceland
4
School of Science and Engineering, University of Reykjavik, Menntavegur 1, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Bioengineering 2020, 7(3), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7030075
Received: 5 June 2020 / Revised: 9 July 2020 / Accepted: 19 July 2020 / Published: 20 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cell Bioprocessing and Manufacturing)
Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells are mesenchymal-like cells, derived from human embryonic stem cells without the aid of feeder cells. They have been suggested as a potential alternative to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in regenerative medicine due to their mesenchymal-like proliferation and differentiation characteristics. Cells and cell products intended for regenerative medicine in humans should be derived, expanded and differentiated using conditions free of animal-derived products to minimize risk of animal-transmitted disease and immune reactions to foreign proteins. Human platelets are rich in growth factors needed for cell culture and have been used successfully as an animal serum replacement for MSC expansion and differentiation. In this study, we compared the proliferation of hES-MP cells and MSCs; the hES-MP cell growth was sustained for longer than that of MSCs. Growth factors, gene expression, and surface marker expression in hES-MP cells cultured with either human platelet lysate (hPL) or fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplementation were compared, along with differentiation to osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. Despite some differences between hES-MP cells grown in hPL- and FBS-supplemented media, hPL was found to be a suitable replacement for FBS. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that hES-MP cells can be grown using platelet lysates from expired platelet concentrates (hPL). View Full-Text
Keywords: embryonic stem cells; mesenchymal stromal cells; blood platelets; cell culture techniques; progenitor cells embryonic stem cells; mesenchymal stromal cells; blood platelets; cell culture techniques; progenitor cells
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jonsdottir-Buch, S.M.; Gunnarsdottir, K.; Sigurjonsson, O.E. Human Embryonic-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells (hES-MP Cells) are Fully Supported in Culture with Human Platelet Lysates. Bioengineering 2020, 7, 75. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7030075

AMA Style

Jonsdottir-Buch SM, Gunnarsdottir K, Sigurjonsson OE. Human Embryonic-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells (hES-MP Cells) are Fully Supported in Culture with Human Platelet Lysates. Bioengineering. 2020; 7(3):75. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7030075

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jonsdottir-Buch, Sandra M., Kristbjorg Gunnarsdottir, and Olafur E. Sigurjonsson. 2020. "Human Embryonic-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells (hES-MP Cells) are Fully Supported in Culture with Human Platelet Lysates" Bioengineering 7, no. 3: 75. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering7030075

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