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Article

Simulating Flash Floods Using Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model

1
Directorate Protected Forest Management Unit, Ministry of Environment and Forestry Republic of Indonesia, Gedung Manggala Wanabhakti Blok I Lantai 12, Jl. Gatot Subroto, Senayan, Jakarta 10270, Indonesia
2
Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13 W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0808, Japan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Hydrology 2020, 7(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010009
Received: 26 September 2019 / Revised: 17 December 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2020 / Published: 25 January 2020
Clarifying hydrologic behavior, especially behavior related to extreme events such as flash floods, is vital for flood mitigation and management. However, discharge and rainfall measurement data are scarce, which is a major obstacle to flood mitigation. This study: (i) simulated flash floods on a regional scale using three types of rainfall forcing implemented in a land surface model; and (ii) evaluated and compared simulated flash floods with the observed discharge. The three types of rainfall forcing were those observed by the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) (Simulation I), the observed rainfall from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation (MLIT) (Simulation II), and the estimated rainfall from the Multi-purpose Transport Satellite (MTSAT), which was downscaled by AMeDAS rainfall (Simulation III). MLIT rainfall observations have a denser station network over the Ishikari River basin (spacing of approximately 10 km) compared with AMeDAS (spacing of approximately 20 km), so they are expected to capture the rainfall spatial distribution more accurately. A land surface model, the Minimal Advance Treatments of Surface Interaction and Runoff (MATSIRO), was implemented for the flash flood simulation. The river flow simulations were run over the Ishikari river basin at a 1-km grid resolution and a 1-h temporal resolution during August 2010. The statistical performance of the river flow simulations during a flash flood event on 23 and 24 August 2010 demonstrated that Simulation I was reasonable compared with Simulation III. The findings also suggest that the advantages of the MTSAT-based estimated rainfall (i.e., good spatial distribution) can be coupled with the benefit of direct AMeDAS observations (i.e., representation of the true rainfall). View Full-Text
Keywords: MTSAT; LSM; heavy rainfall; flash flood MTSAT; LSM; heavy rainfall; flash flood
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MDPI and ACS Style

Suseno, D.P.Y.; Yamada, T.J. Simulating Flash Floods Using Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model. Hydrology 2020, 7, 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010009

AMA Style

Suseno DPY, Yamada TJ. Simulating Flash Floods Using Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model. Hydrology. 2020; 7(1):9. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Suseno, Dwi P.Y., and Tomohito J. Yamada 2020. "Simulating Flash Floods Using Geostationary Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimation Coupled with a Land Surface Model" Hydrology 7, no. 1: 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010009

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