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Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Hydrology in 2019
Article

Assessing Digital Soil Inventories for Predicting Streamflow in the Headwaters of the Blue Nile

1
Faculty of Civil and Water Resources Engineering, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar 6000, Ethiopia
2
Department of Natural Resource Management, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar 6000, Ethiopia
3
Texas A&M Univ, College Station TX 77843, USA
4
Texas A&M AgriLife Res, Temple, TX 76502, USA
5
Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Hydrology 2020, 7(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010008
Received: 30 December 2019 / Revised: 19 January 2020 / Accepted: 20 January 2020 / Published: 24 January 2020
Comprehensive spatially referenced soil data are a crucial input in predicting biophysical and hydrological landscape processes. In most developing countries, these detailed soil data are not yet available. The objective of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the detail needed in soil resource inventories to predict the hydrologic response of watersheds. Using three distinctively different digital soil inventories, the widely used and tested soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) was selected to predict the discharge in two watersheds in the headwaters of the Blue Nile: the 1316 km2 Rib watershed and the nested 3.59 km2 Gomit watershed. The soil digital soil inventories employed were in increasing specificity: the global Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) and the Amhara Design and Supervision Works Enterprise (ADSWE). Hydrologic simulations before model calibration were poor for all three soil inventories used as input. After model calibration, the streamflow predictions improved with monthly Nash–Sutcliffe efficiencies greater than 0.68. Predictions were statistically similar for the three soil databases justifying the use of the global FAO soil map in data-scarce regions for watershed discharge predictions. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil database; soil survey; soil resource inventory; SWAT; watershed; erosion; sediment; Ethiopia; Ethiopian highlands; Africa soil database; soil survey; soil resource inventory; SWAT; watershed; erosion; sediment; Ethiopia; Ethiopian highlands; Africa
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MDPI and ACS Style

Adem, A.A.; Dile, Y.T.; Worqlul, A.W.; Ayana, E.K.; Tilahun, S.A.; Steenhuis, T.S. Assessing Digital Soil Inventories for Predicting Streamflow in the Headwaters of the Blue Nile. Hydrology 2020, 7, 8. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010008

AMA Style

Adem AA, Dile YT, Worqlul AW, Ayana EK, Tilahun SA, Steenhuis TS. Assessing Digital Soil Inventories for Predicting Streamflow in the Headwaters of the Blue Nile. Hydrology. 2020; 7(1):8. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010008

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adem, Anwar A., Yihun T. Dile, Abeyou W. Worqlul, Essayas K. Ayana, Seifu A. Tilahun, and Tammo S. Steenhuis 2020. "Assessing Digital Soil Inventories for Predicting Streamflow in the Headwaters of the Blue Nile" Hydrology 7, no. 1: 8. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7010008

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