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Article

Integration of Microalgae Cultivation in a Biogas Production Process from Organic Municipal Solid Waste: From Laboratory to Pilot Scale

1
Department of Industrial Engineering DII, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova, Italy
2
Interdepartmental Centre Giorgio Levi Cases, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
ChemEngineering 2020, 4(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4020025
Received: 17 March 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 8 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Processing and Biochemical Engineering)
In this study, the feasibility of integrating microalgae cultivation in a biogas production process that treats the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was investigated. In particular, the biomass growth performances in the liquid fraction of the digestate, characterized by high ammonia concentrations and turbidity, were assessed together with the nutrient removal efficiency. Preliminary laboratory-scale experiments were first carried out in photobioreactors operating in a continuous mode (Continuous-flow Stirred-Tank Reactor, CSTR), to gain preliminary data aimed at aiding the subsequent scaling up to a pilot scale facility. An outdoor experimental campaign, operated from July to October 2019, was then performed in a pilot scale raceway pond (4.5 m2), located in Arzignano (VI), Italy, to assess the performances under real environmental conditions. The results show that microalgae could grow well in this complex substrate, although dilution was necessary to enhance light penetration in the culture. In outdoor conditions, nitrification by autotrophic bacteria appeared to be significant, while the photosynthetic nitrogen removal was around 12% with respect to the inlet. On the other hand, phosphorus was almost completely removed from the medium under all the conditions tested, and a biomass production between 2–7 g m−2 d−1 was obtained. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic fraction of municipal solid waste; digestate; raceway pond; microalgae; bioremediation organic fraction of municipal solid waste; digestate; raceway pond; microalgae; bioremediation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barreiro-Vescovo, S.; Barbera, E.; Bertucco, A.; Sforza, E. Integration of Microalgae Cultivation in a Biogas Production Process from Organic Municipal Solid Waste: From Laboratory to Pilot Scale. ChemEngineering 2020, 4, 25. https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4020025

AMA Style

Barreiro-Vescovo S, Barbera E, Bertucco A, Sforza E. Integration of Microalgae Cultivation in a Biogas Production Process from Organic Municipal Solid Waste: From Laboratory to Pilot Scale. ChemEngineering. 2020; 4(2):25. https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4020025

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barreiro-Vescovo, Santiago; Barbera, Elena; Bertucco, Alberto; Sforza, Eleonora. 2020. "Integration of Microalgae Cultivation in a Biogas Production Process from Organic Municipal Solid Waste: From Laboratory to Pilot Scale" ChemEngineering 4, no. 2: 25. https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4020025

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