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Article

Simulated Wildfire Smoke Significantly Alters Sperm DNA Methylation Patterns in a Murine Model

1
Department of Public Health and Population Science, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725, USA
2
Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: João Paulo Teixeira
Toxics 2021, 9(9), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9090199
Received: 22 July 2021 / Revised: 20 August 2021 / Accepted: 26 August 2021 / Published: 27 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Basis of Air-Pollution-Induced Disease Risk)
Wildfires are now a common feature of the western US, increasing in both intensity and number of acres burned over the last three decades. The effects of this changing wildfire and smoke landscape are a critical public and occupational health issue. While respiratory morbidity due to smoke exposure is a priority, evaluating the molecular underpinnings that explain recent extrapulmonary observations is necessary. Here, we use an Apoe−/− mouse model to investigate the epigenetic impact of paternal exposure to simulated wildfire smoke. We demonstrate that 40 days of exposure to smoke from Douglas fir needles induces sperm DNA methylation changes in adult mice. DNA methylation was measured by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing and varied significantly in 3353 differentially methylated regions, which were subsequently annotated to 2117 genes. The differentially methylated regions were broadly distributed across the mouse genome, but the vast majority (nearly 80%) were hypermethylated. Pathway analyses, using gene-derived and differentially methylated region-derived gene ontology terms, point to a number of developmental processes that may warrant future investigation. Overall, this study of simulated wildfire smoke exposure suggests paternal reproductive risks are possible with prolonged exposure. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; particulate matter; sperm; male reproduction; epigenetics air pollution; particulate matter; sperm; male reproduction; epigenetics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schuller, A.; Bellini, C.; Jenkins, T.G.; Eden, M.; Matz, J.; Oakes, J.; Montrose, L. Simulated Wildfire Smoke Significantly Alters Sperm DNA Methylation Patterns in a Murine Model. Toxics 2021, 9, 199. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9090199

AMA Style

Schuller A, Bellini C, Jenkins TG, Eden M, Matz J, Oakes J, Montrose L. Simulated Wildfire Smoke Significantly Alters Sperm DNA Methylation Patterns in a Murine Model. Toxics. 2021; 9(9):199. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9090199

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schuller, Adam, Chiara Bellini, Timothy G. Jenkins, Matthew Eden, Jacqueline Matz, Jessica Oakes, and Luke Montrose. 2021. "Simulated Wildfire Smoke Significantly Alters Sperm DNA Methylation Patterns in a Murine Model" Toxics 9, no. 9: 199. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9090199

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