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Logistics, Volume 1, Issue 2 (December 2017)

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Open AccessArticle An Exploration of Big Data Practices in Retail Sector
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
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Abstract
Connected devices, sensors, and mobile apps make the retail sector a relevant testbed for big data tools and applications. We investigate how big data is, and can be used in retail operations. Based on our state-of-the-art literature review, we identify four themes for
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Connected devices, sensors, and mobile apps make the retail sector a relevant testbed for big data tools and applications. We investigate how big data is, and can be used in retail operations. Based on our state-of-the-art literature review, we identify four themes for big data applications in retail logistics: availability, assortment, pricing, and layout planning. Our semi-structured interviews with retailers and academics suggest that historical sales data and loyalty schemes can be used to obtain customer insights for operational planning, but granular sales data can also benefit availability and assortment decisions. External data such as competitors’ prices and weather conditions can be used for demand forecasting and pricing. However, the path to exploiting big data is not a bed of roses. Challenges include shortages of people with the right set of skills, the lack of support from suppliers, issues in IT integration, managerial concerns including information sharing and process integration, and physical capability of the supply chain to respond to real-time changes captured by big data. We propose a data maturity profile for retail businesses and highlight future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle Accelerated Benders’ Decomposition for Integrated Forward/Reverse Logistics Network Design under Uncertainty
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 27 November 2017 / Published: 9 December 2017
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Abstract
In this paper, a two-stage stochastic programming modelling is proposed, to design a multi-period, multistage, and single-commodity integrated forward/reverse logistics network design problem under uncertainty. The problem involved both strategic and tactical decision levels. The first stage dealt with strategic decisions, which are
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In this paper, a two-stage stochastic programming modelling is proposed, to design a multi-period, multistage, and single-commodity integrated forward/reverse logistics network design problem under uncertainty. The problem involved both strategic and tactical decision levels. The first stage dealt with strategic decisions, which are the number, capacity, and location of forward and reverse facilities. In the second stage, tactical decisions, such as base stock level as an inventory policy, were determined. The generic introduced model consisted of suppliers, manufactures, and distribution centers in forward logistic and collection centers, remanufactures, redistribution, and disposal centers in reverse logistic. The strength of the proposed model is its applicability to various industries. The problem was formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming model and was solved by using Benders’ Decomposition (BD) approach. In order to accelerate the Benders’ decomposition, a number of valid inequalities were added to the master problem. The proposed accelerated BD was evaluated through small-, medium-, and large-sized test problems. Numerical results confirmed that the proposed solution algorithm improved the convergence of BD lower bound and the upper bound, enabling to reach an acceptable optimality gap in a convenient time. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Food Transportation Framework for an Efficient and Worker-Friendly Fresh Food Physical Internet
Received: 28 October 2017 / Revised: 23 November 2017 / Accepted: 29 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
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Abstract
In this paper, we introduce a physical Internet architecture for fresh food distribution networks with the goal of meeting the key challenges of maximizing the freshness of the delivered product and minimizing waste. The physical Internet (PI) architecture is based on the fundamental
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In this paper, we introduce a physical Internet architecture for fresh food distribution networks with the goal of meeting the key challenges of maximizing the freshness of the delivered product and minimizing waste. The physical Internet (PI) architecture is based on the fundamental assumptions of infrastructure sharing among various parties, standardized addressing of all entities and modularized operations. In this paper, we enhance the PI architecture by including a freshness metric and the space-efficient loading/unloading of heterogeneous perishable goods onto the trucks depending on their delivery requirements. We also discuss mechanisms for reducing empty miles of trucks and the carbon footprint of the logistics while reducing the driver’s away-from-home time for long distance delivery. Via extensive simulations, the paper shows that the proposed architecture reduces the driver’s away-from-home time by ∼93%, whereas it improves the food delivery freshness by ∼5%. We show that there is a clear tradeoff between the transportation efficiency of the trucks and the delivery freshness of the food packages. Full article
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Open AccessConcept Paper Third-Party Logistics Providers in the Digital Age: Towards a New Competitive Arena?
Received: 4 September 2017 / Revised: 5 October 2017 / Accepted: 1 November 2017 / Published: 4 November 2017
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Abstract
This paper looks at the impact of digitalization on third-party logistics (3PL) business models. An eclectic framework for the analysis of digital disruptions in service industries is elaborated by linking Porter’s five forces to insights from research on digitalization and innovation. Applying this
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This paper looks at the impact of digitalization on third-party logistics (3PL) business models. An eclectic framework for the analysis of digital disruptions in service industries is elaborated by linking Porter’s five forces to insights from research on digitalization and innovation. Applying this framework to the business field of 3PL reveals that logistics service providers face significant digital hardship from new technologies such as autonomous vehicles and 3D printing as well as from platform-based business models and the sharing economy. We see the following changes in the competitive arena: First, 3PLs focusing on standard services may lose significant market share in the near future. Second, management-related 3PL activities seem to be increasingly offered by new external competitors, which may downgrade 3PLs to simple forwarders. Third, digitalization enables the forward or backward integration of 3PL customers and suppliers when they establish their own services. In addition to its threats, the opportunities of digitalization for 3PLs are discussed. These include the customization of standardized logistics services, the provision of cloud logistics services, platform-based asset and logistics infrastructure sharing, the “physical internet” as a future transportation system and the adoption and integration of 3D printing into existing 3PL business models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Logistics)
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Open AccessArticle The Social Investment Capital and the Cargo Volume Transported by Sea: A VAR Approach for Vietnam
Received: 6 March 2017 / Revised: 8 September 2017 / Accepted: 14 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 787 | PDF Full-text (370 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Social investment capital is one of the factors in Vietnam’s economic growth. It also has a broad impact on many manufacturing and service sectors in the national economy, including maritime transport. This article will apply a quantitative method named vector autoregression (VAR) to
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Social investment capital is one of the factors in Vietnam’s economic growth. It also has a broad impact on many manufacturing and service sectors in the national economy, including maritime transport. This article will apply a quantitative method named vector autoregression (VAR) to define the impacts of social investment capital on the quantity of cargo transported by sea. Special attention will be paid to investment from the government and foreign investors. Recommendations will be suggested to improve the current situation of shipping companies in particular, and the shipping industry in general in Vietnam. Full article
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