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Open AccessArticle

The Climate and Nutritional Impact of Beef in Different Dietary Patterns in Denmark

1
Department of Agroecology, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Aarhus University, Blichers Allé 20, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
2
National Food Institute, DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, Building 201, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091176
Received: 10 July 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 19 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Food Security and Sustainability)
There is public focus on the environmental impact, and in particular, the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), related to our food consumption. The aim of the present study was to estimate the carbon footprint (CF), land use and nutritional impact of the different beef products ready to eat in different real-life dietary patterns. Beef products accounted for 513, 560, 409 and 1023 g CO2eq per day, respectively, in the four dietary patterns (Traditional, Fast-food, Green, and High-beef). The total CFs of these diets were 4.4, 4.2, 4.3 and 5.0 kg CO2eq per day (10 MJ), respectively. The Green diet had almost the same CF as the Traditional and the Fast-food diets despite having the lowest intake of beef as well as the lowest intake of red meat in total. A theoretical substitution of beef with other animal products or legumes in each of these three diets reduced the diets’ CF by 4–12% and land use by 5–14%. As regards nutrients, both positive and negative impacts of these substitutions were found but only a few of particular nutritional importance, indicating that replacing beef with a combination of other foods without a significant effect on the nutrient profile of the diet is a potential mitigation option. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; beef; environmental impact; greenhouse gases (GHG); land use; nutrition; life cycle assessment (LCA) diet; beef; environmental impact; greenhouse gases (GHG); land use; nutrition; life cycle assessment (LCA)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mogensen, L.; Hermansen, J.E.; Trolle, E. The Climate and Nutritional Impact of Beef in Different Dietary Patterns in Denmark. Foods 2020, 9, 1176. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091176

AMA Style

Mogensen L, Hermansen JE, Trolle E. The Climate and Nutritional Impact of Beef in Different Dietary Patterns in Denmark. Foods. 2020; 9(9):1176. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091176

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mogensen, Lisbeth; Hermansen, John E.; Trolle, Ellen. 2020. "The Climate and Nutritional Impact of Beef in Different Dietary Patterns in Denmark" Foods 9, no. 9: 1176. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091176

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