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Open AccessEditorial

The Role of Biofilms in the Development and Dissemination of Microbial Resistance within the Food Industry

1
Laboratory of Biology, Microbiology and Biotechnology of Foods (LBMBF), Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of the Environment, University of the Aegean, Ierou Lochou 10 & Makrygianni, 81400 Myrina, Lemnos, Greece
2
Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy (LEPABE), Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
3
Micalis Institute, INRAE, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, 78350 Jouy-en-Josas, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(6), 816; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060816
Received: 15 June 2020 / Accepted: 16 June 2020 / Published: 21 June 2020
Biofilms are multicellular sessile microbial communities embedded in hydrated extracellular polymeric matrices. Their formation is common in microbial life in most environments, while those formed on food-processing surfaces are of considerable interest in the context of food hygiene. Biofilm cells express properties that are distinct from planktonic ones, in particular, notorious resistance to antimicrobial agents. Thus, a special feature of biofilms is that, once they have been developed, they are hard to eradicate, even when careful sanitization procedures are regularly applied. A great deal of ongoing research has investigated how and why surface-attached microbial communities develop such resistance, and several mechanisms are to be acknowledged (e.g., heterogeneous metabolic activity, cell adaptive responses, diffusion limitations, genetic and functional diversification, and microbial interactions). The articles contained in this Special Issue deal with biofilms of some important food-related bacteria (including common pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as spoilage-causing spore-forming bacilli), providing novel insights on their resistance mechanisms and implications, together with novel methods (e.g., use of protective biofilms formed by beneficial bacteria, enzymes) that could be used to overcome such resistance and thus improve the safety of our food supply and protect public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofilms; foodborne pathogens; dairy bacilli; stress adaptation; resistance; disinfection; biocontrol; enzymes; food safety biofilms; foodborne pathogens; dairy bacilli; stress adaptation; resistance; disinfection; biocontrol; enzymes; food safety
MDPI and ACS Style

Giaouris, E.; Simões, M.; Dubois-Brissonnet, F. The Role of Biofilms in the Development and Dissemination of Microbial Resistance within the Food Industry. Foods 2020, 9, 816.

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