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Open AccessArticle

Quantification of Carotenoids, α-Tocopherol, and Ascorbic Acid in Amber, Mulligan, and Laird’s Large Cultivars of New Zealand Tamarillos (Solanum betaceum Cav.)

1
School of Science, Faculty of Health and Environment Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2
Riddet Institute, Centre of Research Excellence, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
3
The Liggins Institute, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
4
School of Sport and Recreation, Faculty of Health and Environment Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(6), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060769
Received: 10 May 2020 / Revised: 5 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 11 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive/Nutraceutical Compounds in Plant Foods)
Amber (yellow), Laird’s Large (red) and Mulligan (purple–red) cultivars of New Zealand tamarillo fruit were separated into pulp (endo- and mesocarp) and peel (exocarp), and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for carotenoids, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid contents. Fresh Mulligan pulp had the highest content of β-carotene (0.9 mg/100 g), α-tocopherol (1.9 mg/100 g), and ascorbic acid (28 mg/100 g). Higher concentrations of β-carotene and ascorbic acid, and lower concentrations of α-tocopherol were detected in pulps compared with peels. Compared with standard serves of other fruit, tamarillo had the highest β-carotene (9–20% RDI (recommended dietary intake)/serve), high ascorbic acid (67–75% RDI/serve), and α-tocopherol (16–23% adequate intake/serve). All cultivars had diverse carotenoid profiles dominated by provitamin A carotenoids (β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin) and xanthophyll carotenoids (lutein; zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin). Favorable growth conditions (high light intensity and low temperature) may explain the higher antioxidant vitamin content in New Zealand tamarillos compared to those from other countries. Tamarillo peels may be used as natural food coloring agent to reduce waste and deliver sustainable production. View Full-Text
Keywords: tamarillo; dietary antioxidants; β-carotene; ascorbic acid; α-tocopherol; carotenoids; provitamin A tamarillo; dietary antioxidants; β-carotene; ascorbic acid; α-tocopherol; carotenoids; provitamin A
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MDPI and ACS Style

Diep, T.T.; Pook, C.; Rush, E.C.; Yoo, M.J.Y. Quantification of Carotenoids, α-Tocopherol, and Ascorbic Acid in Amber, Mulligan, and Laird’s Large Cultivars of New Zealand Tamarillos (Solanum betaceum Cav.). Foods 2020, 9, 769.

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