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Open AccessArticle

Breathing New Life to Ancient Crops: Promoting the Ancient Philippine Grain “Kabog Millet” as an Alternative to Rice

Laboratory of Food Biochemistry, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zürich, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland
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Foods 2020, 9(12), 1727; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121727
Received: 20 October 2020 / Revised: 19 November 2020 / Accepted: 19 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Cereals and Cereal-Based Foods)
Consumption of underutilised ancient crops has huge benefits for our society. It improves food security by diversifying our staple foods and makes our agriculture more adaptable to climate change. The Philippines has a rich biodiversity and many plant species used as staple foods are native to the Philippines. An example of ancient Philippine crops is the kabog millet, an ecotype of Panicum miliaceum. There is a dearth of information about its uses and properties; hence, in this study, the nutritional quality of kabog millet was evaluated. The total starch, % amylose, ash, dietary fibre, proteins, essential amino acid profile, phenolic acids, carotenoids, tocopherols, and the antioxidant properties of its total phenolic acid extracts were compared to four types of rice (white, brown, red, and black) and a reference millet, purchased from local Swiss supermarkets. Our analyses showed that kabog millet has higher total dietary fibre, total protein, total phenolic acids, tocopherols, and carotenoids content than white rice. It also performed well in antioxidant assays. Our results indicate that kabog millet is a good alternative to rice. It is hoped that the results of this study will encourage consumers and farmers to diversify their food palette and address food insecurity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Panicum miliaceum; ancient grains; nutritional quality; dietary fibre; protein; essential amino acids; phenolic acids; carotenoids; antioxidant properties; rice Panicum miliaceum; ancient grains; nutritional quality; dietary fibre; protein; essential amino acids; phenolic acids; carotenoids; antioxidant properties; rice
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MDPI and ACS Style

Narciso, J.O.; Nyström, L. Breathing New Life to Ancient Crops: Promoting the Ancient Philippine Grain “Kabog Millet” as an Alternative to Rice. Foods 2020, 9, 1727. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121727

AMA Style

Narciso JO, Nyström L. Breathing New Life to Ancient Crops: Promoting the Ancient Philippine Grain “Kabog Millet” as an Alternative to Rice. Foods. 2020; 9(12):1727. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121727

Chicago/Turabian Style

Narciso, Joan O.; Nyström, Laura. 2020. "Breathing New Life to Ancient Crops: Promoting the Ancient Philippine Grain “Kabog Millet” as an Alternative to Rice" Foods 9, no. 12: 1727. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121727

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