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Article

Antique Traditional Practice: Phenolic Profile of Virgin Olive Oil Obtained from Fruits Stored in Seawater

1
Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, A. Kovačića 1, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Ivana Lučića 5, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
3
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zagreb, Svetošimunska cesta 25, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1347; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101347
Received: 25 August 2020 / Revised: 14 September 2020 / Accepted: 21 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virgin Olive Oil: Health Benefits and Processing)
Virgin olive oil (VOO) is a functional food specific to the Mediterranean diet and related to human health, especially as a protector of cardiovascular health, in the prevention of several types of cancers, and in modification of immune and inflammatory response. Phenolic compounds have central importance for these extraordinary health benefits. In the production of high-quality olive oils, it is very important to process freshly picked olives and avoid any storage of fruits. However, in Croatia there is a very traditional and environmentally friendly method of olive oil production, where olive fruits are stored in seawater for some time prior to processing. This practice is also notable nowadays since there are people who prefer the characteristic flavor of the “seawater olive oil”, although some people argue against its quality and biomedical relevance. In this study, the phenolic contents of VOO prepared from the immediately processed fresh olives and olives processed after storage in seawater were compared with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and spectrophotometric analysis. The results suggest that “seawater olive oil” should be considered as a safe food of biomedical relevance, as it still contains a significant proportion of important phenolics like hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and oleacein (e.g., 63.2% of total phenols in comparison to VOO). View Full-Text
Keywords: HPLC analysis; olive oil; phenolic compounds; seawater HPLC analysis; olive oil; phenolic compounds; seawater
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MDPI and ACS Style

Torić, J.; Barbarić, M.; Uršić, S.; Jakobušić Brala, C.; Karković Marković, A.; Zebić Avdičević, M.; Benčić, Đ. Antique Traditional Practice: Phenolic Profile of Virgin Olive Oil Obtained from Fruits Stored in Seawater. Foods 2020, 9, 1347. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101347

AMA Style

Torić J, Barbarić M, Uršić S, Jakobušić Brala C, Karković Marković A, Zebić Avdičević M, Benčić Đ. Antique Traditional Practice: Phenolic Profile of Virgin Olive Oil Obtained from Fruits Stored in Seawater. Foods. 2020; 9(10):1347. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101347

Chicago/Turabian Style

Torić, Jelena, Monika Barbarić, Stanko Uršić, Cvijeta Jakobušić Brala, Ana Karković Marković, Maja Zebić Avdičević, and Đani Benčić. 2020. "Antique Traditional Practice: Phenolic Profile of Virgin Olive Oil Obtained from Fruits Stored in Seawater" Foods 9, no. 10: 1347. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101347

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