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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Industrial Boiling on the Nutritional Profile of Common Octopus (Octopus vulgaris)

1
IPMA, I.P., Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, Division of Aquaculture and Upgrading, Av. Alfredo Magalhães Ramalho 6, 1495-165 Lisboa, Portugal
2
CIIMAR, Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos S/N, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal
3
MEtRICs/DCTB, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
4
INSA, I.P., National Institute of Health Dr. Ricardo Jorge, Food and Nutrition Department, Av. Padre Cruz, 1649-016 Lisboa, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The two authors contributed equally to the article.
Foods 2019, 8(9), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090411
Received: 23 August 2019 / Revised: 6 September 2019 / Accepted: 10 September 2019 / Published: 12 September 2019
Industrial cooking of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) under well-established procedures is advantageous for current consumers, which demand healthy and convenient food. This work aimed to evaluate the effect of industrial water boiling, without the addition of salt, on the nutritional profile of common octopus. True retentions (TRs) were calculated for essential nutrients and toxic elements. After boiling, the moisture content decreased, resulting in a concentration of other constituents (protein, fat, fatty acids, majority of amino acids, phosphorus, zinc, and iodine). High TRs were obtained for some essential nutrients: 90.2% (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA), 89.1% (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA), ≥74.6% (indispensable amino acids, IAA), and 86.8% (iodine). In both raw and boiled octopus, polyunsaturated fatty acids (252.2 and 425.1 mg/100 g), leucine (940.1 and 1613.4 mg/100 g), glutamate (1971.5 and 3257.1 mg/100 g), sodium (393.3 and 332.5 mg/100 g), and zinc (12.6 and 16.6 mg/kg) were, respectively, the most abundant fatty acids, IAA, dispensable amino acids, macro, and micro elements. Cadmium, lead, and mercury levels found in boiled octopus were 0.02, 0.10, and 0.08 mg/kg, respectively. The consumption of 150 g (usual portion) of boiled octopus is advisable because it contributes to significant daily intakes of EPA+DHA (>100%), selenium (75.6%), and iodine (12.4%), and 25% of the daily adequate intake of sodium for adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: convenient seafood; healthy food; true retention; fatty acids; amino acids; elemental composition convenient seafood; healthy food; true retention; fatty acids; amino acids; elemental composition
MDPI and ACS Style

Oliveira, H.; Muniz, J.A.; Bandarra, N.M.; Castanheira, I.; Coelho, I.R.; Delgado, I.; Gonçalves, S.; Lourenço, H.M.; Motta, C.; Duarte, M.P.; Nunes, M.L.; Gonçalves, A. Effects of Industrial Boiling on the Nutritional Profile of Common Octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Foods 2019, 8, 411.

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