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Open AccessArticle

Valorization of Tomato Surplus and Waste Fractions: A Case Study Using Norway, Belgium, Poland, and Turkey as Examples

1
Department of Process Technology, Nofima—Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway
2
ILVO—Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research, Technology and Food Science Unit, 9090 Melle, Belgium
3
Department of Food Technology, Alata Horticultural Research Institute, 33740 Mersin, Turkey
4
Department of Soil Science and Vegetable Cultivation, InHort—Research Institute of Horticulture, 96-100 Skierniewice, Poland
5
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Fisica Applicata ‘Nello Carrara’, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
6
NIBIO—Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, N-4353 Klepp Stasjon, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(7), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8070229
Received: 1 June 2019 / Revised: 18 June 2019 / Accepted: 24 June 2019 / Published: 27 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety, Quality and Processing of Fruits and Vegetables)
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Abstract

There is a large potential in Europe for valorization in the vegetable food supply chain. For example, there is occasionally overproduction of tomatoes for fresh consumption, and a fraction of the production is unsuited for fresh consumption sale (unacceptable color, shape, maturity, lesions, etc.). In countries where the facilities and infrastructure for tomato processing is lacking, these tomatoes are normally destroyed, used as landfilling or animal feed, and represent an economic loss for producers and negative environmental impact. Likewise, there is also a potential in the tomato processing industry to valorize side streams and reduce waste. The present paper provides an overview of tomato production in Europe and the strategies employed for processing and valorization of tomato side streams and waste fractions. Special emphasis is put on the four tomato-producing countries Norway, Belgium, Poland, and Turkey. These countries are very different regards for example their climatic preconditions for tomato production and volumes produced, and represent the extremes among European tomato producing countries. Postharvest treatments and applications for optimized harvest time and improved storage for premium raw material quality are discussed, as well as novel, sustainable processing technologies for minimum waste and side stream valorization. Preservation and enrichment of lycopene, the primary health promoting agent and sales argument, is reviewed in detail. The European volume of tomato postharvest wastage is estimated at >3 million metric tons per year. Together, the optimization of harvesting time and preprocessing storage conditions and sustainable food processing technologies, coupled with stabilization and valorization of processing by-products and side streams, can significantly contribute to the valorization of this underutilized biomass. View Full-Text
Keywords: tomato; valorization; sustainable production; processing; lycopene; waste reduction; vegetables; postharvest physiology; healthy food tomato; valorization; sustainable production; processing; lycopene; waste reduction; vegetables; postharvest physiology; healthy food
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MDPI and ACS Style

Løvdal, T.; Van Droogenbroeck, B.; Eroglu, E.C.; Kaniszewski, S.; Agati, G.; Verheul, M.; Skipnes, D. Valorization of Tomato Surplus and Waste Fractions: A Case Study Using Norway, Belgium, Poland, and Turkey as Examples. Foods 2019, 8, 229.

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