Next Article in Journal
Milk Emulsions: Structure and Stability
Previous Article in Journal
Risk Management of Dairy Product Losses as a Tool to Improve the Environment and Food Rescue
Previous Article in Special Issue
Lactic Acid Fermentation as a Pre-Treatment Process for Faba Bean Flour and Its Effect on Textural, Structural and Nutritional Properties of Protein-Enriched Gluten-Free Faba Bean Breads
Open AccessArticle

Overall Nutritional and Sensory Profile of Different Species of Australian Wattle Seeds (Acacia spp.): Potential Food Sources in the Arid Semi-Arid Regions

1
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovations, Health and Food Sciences Precinct, Cooper Plains, Brisbane, QLD 4108, Australia
2
Australian National Fabrication Facility–Queensland Node, Australian Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4067, Australia
3
Health Support Queensland, Queensland Health, Inorganic Chemistry, Forensic and Scientific Services, Coopers Plains, Brisbane, QLD 4108, Australia
4
Karen Sheldon Catering, PO Box 2351, Parap, NT 0812, Australia
5
Department of Chemistry of Biogenic Resources, Technical University of Munich, 94315 Straubing, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(10), 482; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100482
Received: 24 August 2019 / Revised: 6 October 2019 / Accepted: 8 October 2019 / Published: 11 October 2019
Wattle seed (Acacia spp.) is a well-known staple food within indigenous communities in Australia. A detailed investigation of the overall nutritional and sensory profile of four abundant and underutilized Acacia species—A. coriacea, A. cowleana, A. retinodes and A. sophorae—were performed. Additionally, molecular weight of protein extracts from the wattle seeds (WS) was determined. The seeds are rich in protein (23–27%) and dietary fibre (33–41%). Relatively high fat content was found in A. cowleana (19.3%), A. sophorae (14.8%) and A. retinodes (16.4%) with oleic acid being the predominant fatty acid. The seeds contained high amounts of essential amino acids (histidine, lysine, valine, isoleucine and leucine). A. coriacea is rich in iron (43 mg/kg), potassium (10 g/kg) and magnesium (1.7 g/kg). Pentose (xylose/arabinose), glucose, galactose and galacturonic acids were the major sugars found in the four species. Raw seeds from A. sophorae, A. retinodes and A. coriacea have the highest protein molecular weight, between 50–90 kDa, 80 kDa and 50–55 kDa, respectively. There was variation in the sensory profile of the WS species. This study showed that the four WS species have good nutritional value and could be included in human diet or used in food formulations.
Keywords: Wattle seed species; nutritional profile; sensory profile; gel electrophoresis Wattle seed species; nutritional profile; sensory profile; gel electrophoresis
MDPI and ACS Style

Shelat, K.J.; Adiamo, O.Q.; Mantilla, S.M.O.; Smyth, H.E.; Tinggi, U.; Hickey, S.; Rühmann, B.; Sieber, V.; Sultanbawa, Y. Overall Nutritional and Sensory Profile of Different Species of Australian Wattle Seeds (Acacia spp.): Potential Food Sources in the Arid Semi-Arid Regions. Foods 2019, 8, 482.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop