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Article

Acceptance of Cultured Meat in Germany—Application of an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour

Didactics of Biology, School of Biology and Chemistry, Osnabrück University, Barbarastr. 11, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany
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Academic Editors: Ciara McDonnell, Roman Buckow and Michelle Colgrave
Foods 2022, 11(3), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030424
Received: 10 December 2021 / Revised: 25 January 2022 / Accepted: 27 January 2022 / Published: 31 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Future Protein Foods)
This study examines the willingness to consume a cultured meat burger in Germany. Based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), we assessed attitudes, perceived behavioural control, and subjective norms via an online questionnaire. Attitudes were operationalized in this research as general attitudes towards cultured meat and specific attitudes towards a cultured meat burger. Furthermore, the TPB was extended with nutritional-psychological variables including food (technology) neophobia, food disgust, sensation seeking, and green consumption values. In total, 58.4% of the participants reported being willing to consume a cultured meat burger. Using a path model, the extended TPB accounted for 77.8% of the variance in willingness to consume a cultured meat burger. All components of the TPB were significant predictors except general attitudes. The influence of general attitudes was completely mediated by specific attitudes. All nutritional-psychological variables influenced general attitudes. Food technology neophobia was the strongest negative, and green consumption values were the strongest positive predictor of general attitudes. Marketing strategies should therefore target the attitudes of consumers by encouraging the natural perception of cultured meat, using a less technological product name, enabling transparency about the production, and creating a dialogue about both the fears and the environmental benefits of the new technology. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultured meat; attitudes; perceived behavioural control; subjective norms; food technology neophobia; path model cultured meat; attitudes; perceived behavioural control; subjective norms; food technology neophobia; path model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dupont, J.; Harms, T.; Fiebelkorn, F. Acceptance of Cultured Meat in Germany—Application of an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour. Foods 2022, 11, 424. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030424

AMA Style

Dupont J, Harms T, Fiebelkorn F. Acceptance of Cultured Meat in Germany—Application of an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour. Foods. 2022; 11(3):424. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dupont, Jacqueline, Tess Harms, and Florian Fiebelkorn. 2022. "Acceptance of Cultured Meat in Germany—Application of an Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour" Foods 11, no. 3: 424. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030424

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