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Review

Probiotics for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

by 1,2, 1,2,3, 1,2,3,4,5, 1,2,4 and 1,2,3,*
1
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
2
School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
3
(Yangzhou) Institute of Food Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Yangzhou 225004, China
4
National Engineering Research Center for Functional Food, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
5
Wuxi Translational Medicine Research Center, Jiangsu Translational Medicine Research Institute Wuxi Branch, Wuxi 214122, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Joaquín Bautista-Gallego
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1672; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071672
Received: 9 June 2021 / Revised: 9 July 2021 / Accepted: 19 July 2021 / Published: 20 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods and Health Effects)
Accumulating evidence from animal studies supports the potential role of probiotics and prebiotics in alleviating neurodegenerative diseases. However, whether dietary supplementation with probiotics improves cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is unclear. We searched literature databases for relevant randomized control trials and compared the outcomes between control/placebo and intervention groups. The results of the included studies were meta-analyzed using a random-effects model, with standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) calculated as summary statistics. We also performed a risk-of-bias assessment, sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis. Among the 294 articles identified, eight articles involving 174 patients with AD and 446 with MCI were included in the qualitative synthesis and seven studies were meta-analyzed. Our analysis detected high between-group heterogeneity (SMD = 0.43, 95% CI −0.02–0.88, p < 0.0001, I2 = 86.4%) in cognitive function across the included studies. Subgroup analyses identified a significant effect of probiotics on cognitive function only in the studies involving people with MCI (I2 = 44%, p = 0.15 for heterogeneity, p = 0.0002 for overall effect). Our findings suggest that dietary supplementation with probiotics improves cognitive function, especially in people with MCI. View Full-Text
Keywords: probiotics; Alzheimer’s disease; mild cognitive impairment; cognition; meta-analysis probiotics; Alzheimer’s disease; mild cognitive impairment; cognition; meta-analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhu, G.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, H.; Chen, W.; Wang, G. Probiotics for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Foods 2021, 10, 1672. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071672

AMA Style

Zhu G, Zhao J, Zhang H, Chen W, Wang G. Probiotics for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Foods. 2021; 10(7):1672. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071672

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhu, Guangsu, Jianxin Zhao, Hao Zhang, Wei Chen, and Gang Wang. 2021. "Probiotics for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" Foods 10, no. 7: 1672. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071672

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