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Article

Valorization of Greenhouse Horticulture Waste from a Biorefinery Perspective

Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Unit, Department of Energy, Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Academic Editors: Ana Blandino and Ana Belen Diaz
Foods 2021, 10(4), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040814
Received: 10 March 2021 / Revised: 5 April 2021 / Accepted: 7 April 2021 / Published: 9 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Value Added Products from Agro-Food Residues)
Greenhouse cultivation and harvesting generate considerable amounts of organic waste, including vegetal waste from plants and discarded products. This study evaluated the residues derived from tomato cultivation practices in Almería (Spain) as sugar-rich raw materials for biorefineries. First, lignocellulose-based residues were subjected to an alkali-catalyzed extrusion process in a twin-screw extruder (100 °C and 6–12% (w/w) NaOH) to assess maximum sugar recovery during the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis step. A high saccharification yield was reached when using an alkali concentration of 12% (w/w), releasing up to 81% of the initial glucan. Second, the discarded tomato residue was crushed and centrifuged to collect both the juice and the pulp fractions. The juice contained 39.4 g of sugars per 100 g of dry culled tomato, while the pulp yielded an extra 9.1 g of sugars per 100 g of dry culled tomato after an enzymatic hydrolysis process. The results presented herein show the potential of using horticulture waste as an attractive sugar source for biorefineries, including lignocellulose-based residues when effective fractionation processes, such as reactive extrusion technology, are available. View Full-Text
Keywords: tomato waste; enzymatic hydrolysis; extrusion; sugar platform tomato waste; enzymatic hydrolysis; extrusion; sugar platform
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MDPI and ACS Style

Moreno, A.D.; Duque, A.; González, A.; Ballesteros, I.; Negro, M.J. Valorization of Greenhouse Horticulture Waste from a Biorefinery Perspective. Foods 2021, 10, 814. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040814

AMA Style

Moreno AD, Duque A, González A, Ballesteros I, Negro MJ. Valorization of Greenhouse Horticulture Waste from a Biorefinery Perspective. Foods. 2021; 10(4):814. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040814

Chicago/Turabian Style

Moreno, Antonio D., Aleta Duque, Alberto González, Ignacio Ballesteros, and María J. Negro 2021. "Valorization of Greenhouse Horticulture Waste from a Biorefinery Perspective" Foods 10, no. 4: 814. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040814

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