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Microbiota of Chicken Breast and Thigh Fillets Stored under Different Refrigeration Temperatures Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing

1
Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Hellenic Agricultural Organization DIMITRA, Sofokli Venizelou 1, Lycovrissi, 14123 Athens, Greece
2
Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alberto Cepeda Sáez
Foods 2021, 10(4), 765; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040765
Received: 23 February 2021 / Revised: 17 March 2021 / Accepted: 31 March 2021 / Published: 3 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Food Microbiology)
Chicken is one of the most widely consumed meats worldwide. The exploration of the bacterial diversity of chicken meat may provide new insights into the chicken-associated microbiome that will lead to moderation of food spoilage or safety. This study was undertaken to explore the bacterial communities of chicken breast and thigh fillets stored at refrigeration (0 °C and 5 °C) and slightly abuse (10 °C) temperatures for 5 days through conventional cultural methods along with next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis. Total viable counts (TVC), Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were enumerated, while the bacterial communities were mapped through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Chicken breast and thigh fillets possessed a complex bacterial structure that incorporated a total of >200 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) at the genus level. The core microbiota of fresh samples consisted of Acinetobacter, Brochothrix, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Psychrobacter, and Vibrionaceae (family). These genera persisted until the end of storage in >80% of samples, except Psychrobacter and Flavobacterium, while Photobacterium was also identified. Hierarchical clustering showed a distinction of samples based on storage time and chicken part. Conventional plate counting with growth media commonly used in spoilage studies did not always correspond to the microbial community profiles derived from NGS analysis, especially in Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Photobacterium, and Vibrionaceae. Results of the present study highlight Photobacterium and Vibrionaceae, in general, as potent chicken meat spoilers and suggest the necessity to combine classical microbiological methods along with NGS technologies to characterize chicken meat spoilage microbiota. View Full-Text
Keywords: chicken meat; refrigerated storage; next-generation sequencing (NGS); bacterial communities; microbiological analysis; metagenetic analysis chicken meat; refrigerated storage; next-generation sequencing (NGS); bacterial communities; microbiological analysis; metagenetic analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dourou, D.; Spyrelli, E.D.; Doulgeraki, A.I.; Argyri, A.A.; Grounta, A.; Nychas, G.-J.E.; Chorianopoulos, N.G.; Tassou, C.C. Microbiota of Chicken Breast and Thigh Fillets Stored under Different Refrigeration Temperatures Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing. Foods 2021, 10, 765. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040765

AMA Style

Dourou D, Spyrelli ED, Doulgeraki AI, Argyri AA, Grounta A, Nychas G-JE, Chorianopoulos NG, Tassou CC. Microbiota of Chicken Breast and Thigh Fillets Stored under Different Refrigeration Temperatures Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing. Foods. 2021; 10(4):765. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040765

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dourou, Dimitra, Evgenia D. Spyrelli, Agapi I. Doulgeraki, Anthoula A. Argyri, Athena Grounta, George-John E. Nychas, Nikos G. Chorianopoulos, and Chrysoula C. Tassou 2021. "Microbiota of Chicken Breast and Thigh Fillets Stored under Different Refrigeration Temperatures Assessed by Next-Generation Sequencing" Foods 10, no. 4: 765. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040765

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