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Open AccessArticle

Food Choice and Waste in University Dining Commons—A Menus of Change University Research Collaborative Study

1
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Menus of Change University Research Collaborative, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3
Department of Religion and Philosophy, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, PA 17003, USA
4
Housing Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises—Campus Dining, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
5
Cal Dining, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
6
Jones Graduate School of Business, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Luís Miguel Cunha and Ana Pinto de Moura
Foods 2021, 10(3), 577; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030577
Received: 30 January 2021 / Revised: 22 February 2021 / Accepted: 2 March 2021 / Published: 10 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Individual Determinants of Food Choice in a New Decade)
The purpose of this multi-campus research was to investigate the relationships of food type and personal factors with food choice, consumption, and waste behaviors of college students at all-you-care-to-eat dining facilities. The amount of food taken and wasted was indirectly measured in units relative to the plate size using before and after photos taken by the diners themselves. Animal protein and mixed dishes (e.g., stir fry, sandwich) took up more of diners’ plate space and these items were correlated to both greater hedonic appeal as well as a higher likelihood of the item being pre-plated. Greater confidence in liking an item before choosing it was correlated to a larger portion being taken. Finally, increased satisfaction with the meal and frequency of visiting the dining commons was correlated to less food waste. Understanding these potential food choice drivers can help dining facilities better target healthier meals to diners while reducing food waste. View Full-Text
Keywords: food choice; food waste; university dining commons; multiple correspondence analysis food choice; food waste; university dining commons; multiple correspondence analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wiriyaphanich, T.; Guinard, J.-X.; Spang, E.; Amsler Challamel, G.; Valgenti, R.T.; Sinclair, D.; Lubow, S.; Putnam-Farr, E. Food Choice and Waste in University Dining Commons—A Menus of Change University Research Collaborative Study. Foods 2021, 10, 577. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030577

AMA Style

Wiriyaphanich T, Guinard J-X, Spang E, Amsler Challamel G, Valgenti RT, Sinclair D, Lubow S, Putnam-Farr E. Food Choice and Waste in University Dining Commons—A Menus of Change University Research Collaborative Study. Foods. 2021; 10(3):577. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030577

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wiriyaphanich, Tiffany; Guinard, Jean-Xavier; Spang, Edward; Amsler Challamel, Ghislaine; Valgenti, Robert T.; Sinclair, Danielle; Lubow, Samantha; Putnam-Farr, Eleanor. 2021. "Food Choice and Waste in University Dining Commons—A Menus of Change University Research Collaborative Study" Foods 10, no. 3: 577. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030577

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