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Article

Consumer-Led Adaptation of the EsSense Profile® for Herbal Infusions

1
GreenUPorto, DGAOT, Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Campus de Vairão, Rua da Agrária, 747, 4485-646 Vila do Conde, Portugal
2
SenseTest, Lda., Rua Zeferino Costa, 341, 4400-345 Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
3
GreenUPorto, DCeT, Universidade Aberta, Rua do Amial, 752, 4200-055 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Christopher John Smith
Foods 2021, 10(3), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030684
Received: 21 February 2021 / Revised: 17 March 2021 / Accepted: 18 March 2021 / Published: 23 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Individual Determinants of Food Choice in a New Decade)
This work aimed to adapt the EsSense Profile® emotions list to the discrimination of herbal infusions, aiming to evaluate the effect of harvesting conditions on the emotional profile. A panel of 100 consumers evaluated eight organic infusions: lemon verbena, peppermint, lemon thyme, lemongrass, chamomile, lemon balm, globe amaranth and tutsan, using a check-all-that-apply (CATA) ballot with the original EsSense Profile®. A set of criteria was applied to get a discriminant list. First, the terms with low discriminant power and with a frequency mention below 35% were removed. Two focus groups were also performed to evaluate the applicability of the questionnaire. The content analysis of focus groups suggests the removal of the terms good and pleasant, recognized as sensory attributes. Six additional terms were removed, considered to be too similar to other existing emotion terms. Changes in the questionnaire, resulting in a list of 24 emotion terms for the evaluation of selected herbal infusions, were able to discriminate beyond overall liking. When comparing finer differences between plants harvested under different conditions, differences were identified for lemon verbena infusions, yielding the mechanical cut of plant tips as the one leading to a more appealing evoked emotions profile. View Full-Text
Keywords: EsSense Profile® adaptation; loose-leaf herbal infusions; harvesting method; focus-groups; lemon verbena EsSense Profile® adaptation; loose-leaf herbal infusions; harvesting method; focus-groups; lemon verbena
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rocha, C.; Pinto Moura, A.; Pereira, D.; Costa Lima, R.; Cunha, L.M. Consumer-Led Adaptation of the EsSense Profile® for Herbal Infusions. Foods 2021, 10, 684. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030684

AMA Style

Rocha C, Pinto Moura A, Pereira D, Costa Lima R, Cunha LM. Consumer-Led Adaptation of the EsSense Profile® for Herbal Infusions. Foods. 2021; 10(3):684. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030684

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rocha, Célia; Pinto Moura, Ana; Pereira, Diana; Costa Lima, Rui; Cunha, Luís M. 2021. "Consumer-Led Adaptation of the EsSense Profile® for Herbal Infusions" Foods 10, no. 3: 684. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030684

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