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A Review of Hyperscanning and Its Use in Virtual Environments

1
Empathic Computing Laboratory, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Empathic Computing Laboratory, University of South Australia, Adelaide 5095, Australia
3
School of ITEE, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4067, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Informatics 2020, 7(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7040055
Received: 23 November 2020 / Revised: 2 December 2020 / Accepted: 4 December 2020 / Published: 9 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotion, Cognition, and Empathy in Extended Reality Applications)
Hyperscanning is a technique which simultaneously records the neural activity of two or more people. This is done using one of several neuroimaging methods, such as electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The use of hyperscanning has seen a dramatic rise in recent years to monitor social interactions between two or more people. Similarly, there has been an increase in the use of virtual reality (VR) for collaboration, and an increase in the frequency of social interactions being carried out in virtual environments (VE). In light of this, it is important to understand how interactions function within VEs, and how they can be enhanced to improve their quality in a VE. In this paper, we present some of the work that has been undertaken in the field of social neuroscience, with a special emphasis on hyperscanning. We also cover the literature detailing the work that has been carried out in the human–computer interaction domain that addresses remote collaboration. Finally, we present a way forward where these two research domains can be combined to explore how monitoring the neural activity of a group of participants in VE could enhance collaboration among them. View Full-Text
Keywords: virtual reality; augmented reality; Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW); remote collaboration; EEG; fMRI; fNIRS; hyperscanning virtual reality; augmented reality; Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW); remote collaboration; EEG; fMRI; fNIRS; hyperscanning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barde, A.; Gumilar, I.; Hayati, A.F.; Dey, A.; Lee, G.; Billinghurst, M. A Review of Hyperscanning and Its Use in Virtual Environments. Informatics 2020, 7, 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7040055

AMA Style

Barde A, Gumilar I, Hayati AF, Dey A, Lee G, Billinghurst M. A Review of Hyperscanning and Its Use in Virtual Environments. Informatics. 2020; 7(4):55. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7040055

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barde, Amit; Gumilar, Ihshan; Hayati, Ashkan F.; Dey, Arindam; Lee, Gun; Billinghurst, Mark. 2020. "A Review of Hyperscanning and Its Use in Virtual Environments" Informatics 7, no. 4: 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics7040055

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