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Open AccessArticle

Smart Energy Transition: An Evaluation of Cities in South Korea

1
Erasmus Graduate School of Social Science and Humanities (EGSH), Erasmus University, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2
Erasmus School of Social and Behavioural Sciences (ESSB), Erasmus University, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
3
Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (IHS), Erasmus University, 3062 PA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Informatics 2019, 6(4), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics6040050
Received: 5 October 2019 / Revised: 31 October 2019 / Accepted: 4 November 2019 / Published: 6 November 2019
One positive impact of smart cities is reducing energy consumption and CO2 emission through the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). Energy transition pursues systematic changes to the low-carbon society, and it can benefit from technological and institutional advancement in smart cities. The integration of the energy transition to smart city development has not been thoroughly studied yet. The purpose of this study is to find empirical evidence of smart cities’ contributions to energy transition. The hypothesis is that there is a significant difference between smart and non-smart cities in the performance of energy transition. The Smart Energy Transition Index is introduced. Index is useful to summarize the smart city component’s contribution to energy transition and to enable comparison among cities. The cities in South Korea are divided into three groups: (1) first-wave smart cities that focus on smart transportation and security services; (2) second-wave smart cities that provide comprehensive urban services; and (3) non-smart cities. The results showed that second-wave smart cities scored higher than first-wave and non-smart cities, and there is a statistically significant difference among city groups. This confirms the hypothesis of this paper that smart city development can contribute to the energy transition. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart city; smart energy transition; evaluation index; South Korea smart city; smart energy transition; evaluation index; South Korea
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Lim, Y.; Edelenbos, J.; Gianoli, A. Smart Energy Transition: An Evaluation of Cities in South Korea. Informatics 2019, 6, 50.

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