Next Article in Journal
Pediatric Epilepsy Mechanisms: Expanding the Paradigm of Excitation/Inhibition Imbalance
Next Article in Special Issue
Obesity and Hypogonadism—A Narrative Review Highlighting the Need for High-Quality Data in Adolescents
Previous Article in Journal
Cognitive Functioning in Patients with Pediatric-Onset Multiple Sclerosis, an Updated Review and Future Focus
Previous Article in Special Issue
Pediatric Fatty Liver and Obesity: Not Always Just a Matter of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Open AccessCase Report

Use of Lisdexamfetamine to Treat Obesity in an Adolescent with Severe Obesity and Binge Eating

1
Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nutrition & Weight Management, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, 720 Harrison Avenue, Suite 801, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2
Boston Medical Center, Nutrition and Weight Management Center, 720 Harrison Avenue, Suite 801, Boston, MA 02114, USA
3
Eastern Maine Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, WOW Pediatric & Adolescent Weight & Cardiometabolic Clinic, Orono, ME 04401, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2019, 6(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6020022
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 4 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Obesity and Metabolic Dysregulation in Childhood)
Approximately two-thirds of US children and adolescents have either obesity or overweight status, with almost 24% of adolescents (ages 12–19 years) afflicted with severe obesity, defined as >1.2 × the 95th BMI percentile for age/gender. Despite the increasing disproportionate rise in severe or extreme childhood obesity, many children in weight management programs do not achieve a healthy weight. Most often, these patients will go on to require metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS), but challenges and limitations may prohibit MBS on adolescents. Thus, tertiary care pediatric weight management centers are compelled to treat select pediatric obesity subtypes presenting with disease progression and disability with the available adult FDA-approved therapeutic modalities, specifically pharmacotherapy, in order to alleviate the disease state and provide relief to the patient. Here, we describe a case of severe pediatric obesity where a dedicated multidisciplinary pediatric weight management team at a tertiary care center utilizes a progressive pharmacotherapeutic approach with enormous benefits to the patient, highlighting the urgent gap and clinical care needs of this special population niche of severe adolescent obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: severe pediatric obesity; adolescent obesity; pharmacotherapy; lisdexamfetamine; BMI percentile; weight loss medication; pediatric weight management severe pediatric obesity; adolescent obesity; pharmacotherapy; lisdexamfetamine; BMI percentile; weight loss medication; pediatric weight management
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Srivastava, G.; O’Hara, V.; Browne, N. Use of Lisdexamfetamine to Treat Obesity in an Adolescent with Severe Obesity and Binge Eating. Children 2019, 6, 22. https://doi.org/10.3390/children6020022

AMA Style

Srivastava G, O’Hara V, Browne N. Use of Lisdexamfetamine to Treat Obesity in an Adolescent with Severe Obesity and Binge Eating. Children. 2019; 6(2):22. https://doi.org/10.3390/children6020022

Chicago/Turabian Style

Srivastava, Gitanjali; O’Hara, Valerie; Browne, Nancy. 2019. "Use of Lisdexamfetamine to Treat Obesity in an Adolescent with Severe Obesity and Binge Eating" Children 6, no. 2: 22. https://doi.org/10.3390/children6020022

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop