Next Article in Journal
Lifestyle Modification for Enhancing Autonomic Cardiac Regulation in Children: The Role of Exercise
Previous Article in Journal
Topical and Oral Therapies for Childhood Atopic Dermatitis and Plaque Psoriasis
Open AccessArticle

When the Future is Not Bright: Social and Political Stakes in Discussing Childhood Cancer in Romanian Media

Sociology Department, Babeș-Bolyai University, 400604 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2019, 6(11), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6110126
Received: 4 October 2019 / Revised: 5 November 2019 / Accepted: 13 November 2019 / Published: 15 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Illness and Death in Childhood)
In contemporary societies’ perception of children, death plays an incredibly insignificant role. This role goes from being ornamental, a weak reminder that our civilisation has overcome the times of children’s high mortality rates, to being some other society’s concern. Despite both medical improvements and cultural constructions of the child as an immanent and social transcendence, children can and do die. Although an increasing number of recent studies disclose and legitimise children’s preoccupation with death and dying in the context of a popular culture fascinated with death, studies interested in the representations of death and dying in children are rather scant. In this article, we investigate the social and political stakes in discussing children’s cancer in today’s Romanian media, aiming to make visible how the illustrations of the connections between children, death and illness are never ethically neutral. We begin with the observation that, during recent years, there has been a growing media focus on childhood cancer in Romania. Adopting a qualitative approach and resorting to comparative analysis, we analyse what lies beneath the intentions of criticising troublesome socio-political or medical realities of childhood cancer, revealing the mechanisms through which childhood cancer is transformed into a social illness and the cultural implications for the acceptance of death as an inherent part of life both for children and the population as a whole. View Full-Text
Keywords: death; children; childhood cancer; media; immanent transcendence; social transcendence; social illness; national illness; death acceptance death; children; childhood cancer; media; immanent transcendence; social transcendence; social illness; national illness; death acceptance
MDPI and ACS Style

Teodorescu, A.; Chiribucă, D. When the Future is Not Bright: Social and Political Stakes in Discussing Childhood Cancer in Romanian Media. Children 2019, 6, 126.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop