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Children 2019, 6(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6010008

Association between Access to Electronic Devices in the Home Environment and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Children

Department of Health, Kinesiology and Recreation, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
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Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 4 January 2019 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 9 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Integrative Pediatrics)
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Abstract

This study examined the association between access to electronic devices in the home and cardiorespiratory fitness in children. Participants were children aged 8–12 years from a local elementary school (n = 106, mean age = 9.7 + 1.1 years, male = 50). Child access to electronic devices was measured with a 37-item parent-reported questionnaire. Estimated maximal aerobic capacity (VO2 Peak) was calculated from The Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) using a validated algorithm. The association between access to electronic devices in the home and cardiorespiratory fitness was explored by employing hierarchical ridge regression, using the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) model, controlling for the covariates of sex, age, and Body Mass Index (BMI). Controlling for sex, age, and BMI, the number of electronic items in a child’s bedroom was significantly inversely related to the estimated VO2 Peak (b = −1.30 mL/kg/min, 95% C.I.: −2.46 mL/kg/min, −0.15 mL/kg/min, p = 0.028) and PACER laps (b = −3.70 laps, 95% C.I.: −6.97 laps, −0.41 laps, p = 0.028) However, the total number of electronic items in the home and total number of electronic items owned did not significantly relate to the estimated VO2 Peak (p = 0.847, 0.964) or the number of PACER laps (p = 0.847, 0.964). Child health behavior interventions focused on the home environment should devote specific attention to the bedroom as a primary locus of easily modifiable intervention. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical fitness; sedentary behavior; screen-time; children physical fitness; sedentary behavior; screen-time; children
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Pfledderer, C.D.; Burns, R.D.; Brusseau, T.A. Association between Access to Electronic Devices in the Home Environment and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Children. Children 2019, 6, 8.

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