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Integrating Pediatric Hypnosis with Complementary Modalities: Clinical Perspectives on Personalized Treatment

1
National Pediatric Hypnosis Training Institute (NPHTI), 29 Western Terrace, Minneapolis, MN 55426, USA
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Partners-in-Healing, 10505 Wayzata Blvd #200, Minnetonka, MN 55305, USA
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Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St SE #353, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA
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Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55404, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2018, 5(8), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5080108
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 30 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementing Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Practice)
While pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) emphasizes an “evidence-based practice using multiple therapeutic modalities”; paradoxically, literature reviews examining the prevalence and/or efficacy of such mind–body approaches often address PIM modalities separately. Such contributions are relevant, yet documentation of how to deliver combined complementary approaches in children and youth are scarce. Nevertheless, integrative practitioners in clinical practice routinely mix approaches to meet the individual needs of each patient. Best practices are flexible, and include blending and augmenting services within the same session, and/or connecting modalities sequentially for an incremental effect, and/or referring to outside resources for additional interventions. Resonating with integrative medicine’s definition, this article’s goal is to demonstrate paradigms that “bring together complementary approaches in a coordinated way within clinical practice” by linking clinical hypnosis, the trail-blazer modality in PIM’s history, with mindfulness, biofeedback, acupuncture, and yoga. Following the consideration of the overlap of guided imagery with hypnosis and an abridged literature report, this clinical perspective considers the selection of modalities within a collaborative relationship with the child/teen and parents, emphasizing goodness-of-fit with patients’ contexts, e.g., symptoms, resources, interests, goals, and developmental stage. Case vignettes illustrate practical strategies for mixing approaches. View Full-Text
Keywords: integrative medicine; hypnosis; mindfulness; biofeedback; acupuncture; yoga; guided imagery; self-regulation; complementary; education integrative medicine; hypnosis; mindfulness; biofeedback; acupuncture; yoga; guided imagery; self-regulation; complementary; education
MDPI and ACS Style

Kaiser, P.; Kohen, D.P.; Brown, M.L.; Kajander, R.L.; Barnes, A.J. Integrating Pediatric Hypnosis with Complementary Modalities: Clinical Perspectives on Personalized Treatment. Children 2018, 5, 108.

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