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Article

Bright Light Therapy in Older Adults with Moderate to Very Severe Dementia: Immediate Effects on Behavior, Mood, and Physiological Parameters

Universidade da Coruña, Gerontology and Geriatrics Research Group, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de A Coruña (INIBIC), Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de A Coruña (CHUAC), SERGAS, 15071 A Coruña, Spain
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Academic Editor: Phyo Kyaw Myint
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 1065; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081065
Received: 7 July 2021 / Revised: 15 August 2021 / Accepted: 16 August 2021 / Published: 19 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare and Rehabilitation of Older Adults)
Bright light therapy (BLT) has demonstrated positive short- and long-term effects in people with cognitive impairment or dementia; however, the immediate impact of BLT sessions has been scarcely investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the immediate effects of BLT on behavior, mood, and physiological parameters (oxygen saturation/heart rate) in a sample of institutionalized older adults with moderate to very severe dementia, with a median age of 85.0 (interquartile range, IQR, 82.0–90.0), being higher in men (87.0 years, IQR 80.0–94.0) than in women (84.5 years, IQR 82.0–89.5). The BLT protocol consisted of 30-min morning sessions of 10,000 lux, Monday through Friday, for 4 weeks. The physiological parameters were recorded immediately before and after each session by pulse oximetry. Mood and behavior were assessed before, after, and during the sessions using the Interact scale. Post-session Interact scores showed a significant decrease in the items Tearful/sad and Talked spontaneously, and a significant increase in the items Enjoying self, active or alert, and Relaxed, content or sleeping appropriately. Interact scores during the sessions reflected a significant decrease in the speech-related items. Both physiological parameters changed positively from before to after sessions. Our results suggest that BLT provides immediate positive effects on mood, stimulation level, and physiological parameters, as well as a trend toward decreased speech. More robust research is needed to further explore the immediate impact of BLT. This study is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04949984). View Full-Text
Keywords: bright light therapy; dementia; mood; behavior; oxygen saturation; heart rate bright light therapy; dementia; mood; behavior; oxygen saturation; heart rate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cibeira, N.; Maseda, A.; Lorenzo-López, L.; González-Abraldes, I.; López-López, R.; Rodríguez-Villamil, J.L.; Millán-Calenti, J.C. Bright Light Therapy in Older Adults with Moderate to Very Severe Dementia: Immediate Effects on Behavior, Mood, and Physiological Parameters. Healthcare 2021, 9, 1065. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081065

AMA Style

Cibeira N, Maseda A, Lorenzo-López L, González-Abraldes I, López-López R, Rodríguez-Villamil JL, Millán-Calenti JC. Bright Light Therapy in Older Adults with Moderate to Very Severe Dementia: Immediate Effects on Behavior, Mood, and Physiological Parameters. Healthcare. 2021; 9(8):1065. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081065

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cibeira, Nuria, Ana Maseda, Laura Lorenzo-López, Isabel González-Abraldes, Rocío López-López, José L. Rodríguez-Villamil, and José C. Millán-Calenti. 2021. "Bright Light Therapy in Older Adults with Moderate to Very Severe Dementia: Immediate Effects on Behavior, Mood, and Physiological Parameters" Healthcare 9, no. 8: 1065. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081065

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