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Article

Effect of an EMG–FES Interface on Ankle Joint Training Combined with Real-Time Feedback on Balance and Gait in Patients with Stroke Hemiparesis

1
Graduate School of Physical Therapy, Sahmyook University, Seoul 01795, Korea
2
Department of Physical Therapy, Sahmyook University, Seoul 01795, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 292; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030292
Received: 2 August 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 21 August 2020 / Published: 24 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Care and Services for Elderly Population)
This study evaluated the effects of an electromyography–functional electrical stimulation interface (EMG–FES interface) combined with real-time balance and gait feedback on ankle joint training in patients with stroke hemiplegia. Twenty-six stroke patients participated in this study. All subjects were randomly assigned to either the EMG–FES interface combined with real-time feedback on ankle joint training (RFEF) group (n = 13) or the EMG–FES interface on ankle joint training (EF) group (n = 13). Subjects in both groups were trained for 20 min a day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. Similarly, all participants underwent a standard rehabilitation physical therapy for 60 min a day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The RFEF group showed significant increases in weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT), Tardieu Scale (TS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), velocity, cadence, step length, stride length, stance per, and swing per (p < 0.05). Likewise, the EF group showed significant increases in WBLT, TUG, BBS, velocity, and cadence (p < 0.05). Moreover, the RFEF group showed significantly greater improvements than the EF group in terms of WBLT, Tardieu Scale, TUG, BBS, velocity, step length, stride length, stance per, and swing per (p < 0.05). Ankle joint training using an EMG–FES interface combined with real-time feedback improved ankle range of motion (ROM), muscle tone, balance, and gait in stroke patients. These results suggest that an EMG–FES interface combined with real-time feedback is feasible and suitable for ankle joint training in individuals with stroke. View Full-Text
Keywords: stroke; action observation; real-time feedback; balance; gait stroke; action observation; real-time feedback; balance; gait
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bae, S.; Lee, J.; Lee, B.-H. Effect of an EMG–FES Interface on Ankle Joint Training Combined with Real-Time Feedback on Balance and Gait in Patients with Stroke Hemiparesis. Healthcare 2020, 8, 292. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030292

AMA Style

Bae S, Lee J, Lee B-H. Effect of an EMG–FES Interface on Ankle Joint Training Combined with Real-Time Feedback on Balance and Gait in Patients with Stroke Hemiparesis. Healthcare. 2020; 8(3):292. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030292

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bae, Subeen, Jin Lee, and Byoung-Hee Lee. 2020. "Effect of an EMG–FES Interface on Ankle Joint Training Combined with Real-Time Feedback on Balance and Gait in Patients with Stroke Hemiparesis" Healthcare 8, no. 3: 292. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030292

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