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Health Care Responsibility and Compassion-Visiting the Housebound Patient Severely Affected by ME/CFS
Open AccessCase Report

Severe ME in Children

Paediatrician, Southlands, Gilesgate, Durham DH1 1QN, UK
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030211
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 6 July 2020 / Accepted: 9 July 2020 / Published: 14 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ME/CFS – the Severely and Very Severely Affected)
A current problem regarding Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is the large proportion of doctors that are either not trained or refuse to recognize ME/CFS as a genuine clinical entity, and as a result do not diagnose it. An additional problem is that most of the clinical and research studies currently available on ME are focused on patients who are ambulant and able to attend clinics and there is very limited data on patients who are very severe (housebound or bedbound), despite the fact that they constitute an estimated 25% of all ME/CFS cases. This author has personal experience of managing and advising on numerous cases of severe paediatric ME, and offers a series of case reports of individual cases as a means of illustrating various points regarding clinical presentation, together with general principles of appropriate management. View Full-Text
Keywords: Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME); Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS); Severe ME; Very Severe ME; Post-Exertional Malaise (PEM); Fabricated and Induced Illness; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; Graded Exercise Therapy; Pervasive Refusal Syndrome; immunoglobulin Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME); Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS); Severe ME; Very Severe ME; Post-Exertional Malaise (PEM); Fabricated and Induced Illness; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; Graded Exercise Therapy; Pervasive Refusal Syndrome; immunoglobulin
MDPI and ACS Style

Speight, N. Severe ME in Children. Healthcare 2020, 8, 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030211

AMA Style

Speight N. Severe ME in Children. Healthcare. 2020; 8(3):211. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030211

Chicago/Turabian Style

Speight, Nigel. 2020. "Severe ME in Children" Healthcare 8, no. 3: 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030211

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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