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Medication Error Rate in Transition of Care: General Practitioner (GP) Referrals to a Regional Emergency Department

1
School of Medicine, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Burnie 7320, Tasmania, Australia
2
Tasmanian Health Service, North West Regional Hospital, Burnie 7320, Tasmania, Australia
3
Rural Clinical School, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Burnie 7320, Tasmania, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2019, 7(4), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7040152
Received: 10 October 2019 / Revised: 25 November 2019 / Accepted: 26 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)
Medication errors have a significant impact on patient outcomes, increase healthcare costs, and are a common cause of preventable morbidity. This single-site, observational, diagnostic accuracy study aimed to quantify medication discrepancies in transition of care from primary care to the emergency department (ED) over a 12-month period. Medication lists in General Practitioner (GP) referrals to a regional ED were examined against a Best Possible Medication History (BPMH) performed by a hospital pharmacist. One hundred and forty-three patients (25%) with computer-generated GP referrals to ED who were subsequently admitted to hospital had a BPMH taken; 135 (94%) of these had at least one medication discrepancy identified with a discrepancy rate of 67.18 discrepancies per 100 medications. Improving medication reconciliation in the community may reduce the burden associated with preventable medication errors. Whether this is achieved by more frequent GP-led medication review or community-based pharmacist medication review may depend on the community and available resources. View Full-Text
Keywords: medication; general practice; discrepancy; pharmacist; risk; referral; best practice medication history medication; general practice; discrepancy; pharmacist; risk; referral; best practice medication history
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MDPI and ACS Style

Prior, S.J.; Cheek, C.; Cheah, D.; Etherington, C.; Williams, A.; Reeves, N.S. Medication Error Rate in Transition of Care: General Practitioner (GP) Referrals to a Regional Emergency Department. Healthcare 2019, 7, 152. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7040152

AMA Style

Prior SJ, Cheek C, Cheah D, Etherington C, Williams A, Reeves NS. Medication Error Rate in Transition of Care: General Practitioner (GP) Referrals to a Regional Emergency Department. Healthcare. 2019; 7(4):152. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7040152

Chicago/Turabian Style

Prior, Sarah J.; Cheek, Colleen; Cheah, Dong; Etherington, Christopher; Williams, Abigail; Reeves, Nicole S. 2019. "Medication Error Rate in Transition of Care: General Practitioner (GP) Referrals to a Regional Emergency Department" Healthcare 7, no. 4: 152. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7040152

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