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Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9010034

Pre-Service Teachers’ Perception of Financial Literacy Curriculum: National Standards, Universal Design, and Cultural Responsiveness

1
Department of Special and Early Education, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA
2
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 January 2019 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Education)
Full-Text   |   PDF [277 KB, uploaded 26 February 2019]

Abstract

For youth with disabilities, the economic challenges of adulthood pose substantial risks. While the need for financial skills to navigate the economic climate is critical, access to financial education presents many challenges. High school is the optimal time for students with disabilities to access financial education; however, contact is limited. One factor in this limited access may be linked to special educators’ lack of knowledge of financial literacy curricula as such resources are typically not part of their teacher preparation. Using a rubric developed by Henning and Johnston-Rodriguez, preservice teachers evaluated five examples of relevant financial literacy curricula: Financial Fitness for Life, Practical Money Skills, Finance in the Classroom, Money Talks 4 Teens, and Money Smart for Young Adults. Preservice teachers found one curriculum to be most comprehensive in teaching standards-based financial literacy concepts relevant to students with special needs as well as principles of universal design and cultural responsiveness. Each of the other curricula was found to have merit in some respects, suggesting an eclectic approach of mixing some of the curricula depending on teacher and student goals. View Full-Text
Keywords: curricula; financial literacy; students with disabilities; teacher education; Universal Design for Learning; culturally responsive curriculum; economic education; preservice teachers; curriculum evaluation curricula; financial literacy; students with disabilities; teacher education; Universal Design for Learning; culturally responsive curriculum; economic education; preservice teachers; curriculum evaluation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Johnston-Rodriguez, S.; Henning, M.B. Pre-Service Teachers’ Perception of Financial Literacy Curriculum: National Standards, Universal Design, and Cultural Responsiveness. Educ. Sci. 2019, 9, 34.

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